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FAQs

What does the warning buzzer and subsequent flashing light mean?

You should read your Owner’s Manual before operating your Suzuki Outboard. It will explain various warnings you might encounter during operation. The monitor gauge will illuminate why the warning buzzer has sounded. If the warning buzzer is indicating a problem with oil or overheating, it will also be accompanied by a reduction in maximum RPM. The buzzer will sound when the engine is started. The warning system will sound and the oil light will illuminate after the first 20 hours of operation – it is time for the first oil change. This process will repeat after another 80 hours of operation and then again after every 100 hours of operation. Conditions like low oil and overheating can seriously damage your engine. If you are unable to determine why the buzzer has sounded, you should check with your authorized Suzuki Marine dealer before continued operation.

Can I use the Tilt Support Lever for transporting my Suzuki outboard?

No. The Tilt Support Lever is to be used only for storage purposes. The Tilt Support Lever was not designed to withstand the strain of transport and could break causing damage to the Tlit Support Lever and/or other bracket components. There are many aftermarket companies that provide “transom savers” that can offer a solution for your transportation needs. Please make sure that whatever aftermarket component you use is designed to work specifically with your Suzuki outboard. You can review “Storage and Transportation” instruction in your Owner’s Manual. You can find this information in the Maintenance section.

May I start the engine out of water?

Never start your engine out of water unless you are using an external lower-unit flushing adapter, commonly known as “ear muffs” designed for your type of outboard motor (not the integral Freshwater Flush Adapter found on some engines) to provide cooling water from a garden hose. Otherwise, you could damage or seize the engine. Operate at no more than an advanced idle with good water pressure. Never put the engine in gear. Never leave a running engine unattended.

Is there a specific oil requirement to maintain my Suzuki four-stroke Outboard?

We suggest that customer use Genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards.

What is the best way to get answers to questions I have about my Suzuki Outboard Motor?

Your Owner’s Manual or local Suzuki dealer can answer most common questions.

What are the average costs of dealer service centers including parts and labor-shop rates?

Shop rates vary around the nation and within each state. They can range anywhere from $50.00 per hour to $160.00 per hour. This rate is subject to change. As far as what dealers charge for basic maintenance, your best bet would be to call a few dealers. All of the Suzuki Marine dealers are listed on this web site.

Is there a specific oil requirement to maintain my Suzuki four-stroke Outboard?

We suggest that customer use Genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards.

Can I get parts for a very old Suzuki outboard?

Suzuki will do its best to get you the parts you need, but the older the motor, the less likely it is that parts will be readily available. Availability, to a certain extent, depends on how many models the specific part was used for and the number of years your model was produced. You’ll find the manufacturer’s identification tag on the motor mount bracket, generally on the starboard (right) side of the bracket. Be sure to take down all the information on the model designator, including all prefixes and suffixes and show it to your Suzuki dealer. We’ll do everything possible to help you get new parts for your older Suzuki outboard.

How often should I change my oil in my Suzuki outboard?

The first oil change is at the 20-hour service and then every 6 months or 100 hours. No big deal.

What type of oil should I use in my Suzuki outboard?

We suggest that customers use genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards. The actual oil recommendation is: SAE or NMMA FC-W 10W-40 (operating in temps from 14 degrees to over 100 degrees F) or 10W-30 (operating in temps from -4 degrees to 86 degrees F) API or NMMA FC-W Classification SE,SF,SG,SJ. For temps below -15 degrees F use SAE or NMMA FC-W 5W-30.

I keep my boat in the water and am concerned about flushing it regularly. What can I do?

Suzuki outboards are equipped with fresh water flush ports (all models except DF2.5, 9.9, 15, 40 and 50). A simple garden hose attachment makes it easy to clean the cooling system of saltwater and impurities. In fact, DF70, 80, 90, 250SS and 300 have dual flushing ports. One is located on the backside of the down housing and the second is located on the front panel to provide easy access and no excuses.

Is the timing chain really maintenance free?

Yes it is! The timing chain is located below the powerhead where it runs in a continual oil bath for dependable and quiet operation. With Suzuki’s exclusive automatic hydraulic chain tensioner, you can focus on boating and having a good time. (DF40, 50, 60, 70, 90, 115, 140, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 250SS, 300).

How do I enhance fuel efficiency?

Use the propeller that best suits your boat and style of boating.

Propeller size and pitch can have a great effect on fuel efficiency. Too much pitch can overload the motor. Too little can result in over-revving and engine damage. Suzuki offers a wide selection of propellers to meet anyone’s needs.

Use the highest quality gasoline and oil available.

Low octane, stale or contaminated fuel simply doesn’t burn as efficiently as fresh, high-grade gasoline. The same holds true for oil, as cheap, low-quality oils can foul spark plugs and create deposits. Use Suzuki oil to ensure quality.

Check all of your safety gear and keep track of what is in your boat.

It is a good idea to look through every and all storage areas of your boat. Check all of your safety gear and replace the broken or worn out items as necessary.

Keep your engine tuned up.

Periodically replace the spark plugs, fuel filters and other components that affect fuel efficiency. Check your owner’s manual for the recommended service schedule. If you don’t feel comfortable servicing the outboard engine yourself, take it to your marine dealer.

Make sure the bottom of your boat is as clean as possible.

If you keep your boat in the water, have the bottom cleaned often of growths such as barnacles and algae. And make sure any bottom paint (EPA-approved) is applied smoothly, with brush strokes running parallel to the keel.

Trim your engine for maximum fuel economy.

The trim angle can strongly influence fuel economy. Check your owner’s manual or see your marine dealer for the proper trim techniques.

Operate your boat in a reasonable and safe manner.

Don’t operate your boat at excessive speed, and use extra throttle only when necessary. Not only is it safer, but you’ll maximize your fuel efficiency as well.

How do I care for an onboard battery system?

Make sure you’re using marine-type batteries.

Automotive batteries are not designed to handle the demands created by marine applications. Marine batteries are designed with thicker plates and other heavy-duty features that help them withstand the jarring life aboard a boat.

Use deep-cycle batteries for running electrical accessories.

A boat equipped with electrical accessories such as Tolling Motors, GPS, VHF Radios, Bait Pumps, Windless, and Fish Finders should be using one or more “deep-cycle” marine batteries. While most other kinds of batteries are designed to provide a lot of current in a short burst (such as when starting your engine), deep-cycle batteries provide smaller amounts of power for a longer time. Deep-cycle batteries also stand up better to repeated discharge/recharge cycles.

Inspect your battery condition regularly.

Test your marine battery system on a regular basis to ensure that it’s in top working condition. This is especially important after winter storage. Check the battery exterior for damage or cracks, and replace immediately if any are found. Inspect the cables and terminals, and make sure they are firmly attached, without cracks or corrosion. Coat the terminals with an insulating film of grease, install anti-corrosive washers, or apply protective battery terminal spray. If your battery is the “open cell” type, check its water level. If low, refill with distilled water.

Consider a dual battery system.

If you fish long distances offshore or cruise to remote locations, you should consider a dual battery system. This virtually doubles your onboard electrical power and provides an important back-up of reserve power. Options include a system with a selector switch, allowing you to choose one or the other battery (or both), or a battery isolator, which automatically directs your engine’s charging power to the battery that needs it most. Note: never switch battery selector while engine(s) is (are) running.

Re-charge your batteries immediately after each trip.

Waiting several days after a trip to charge your batteries will allow deposits to develop on the internal plates, reducing their capacity to provide power. Suzuki’s high-output alternators help to minimize this, but if your batteries need to be recharged, do so immediately to minimize deposits and extend the life of your battery.

Use at least a 10- to 15-amp battery charger.

Do not use a “trickle” charger, and make sure you bring your batteries up to 100 percent state of charge before using again.

How do I use and care for my outboard engine in saltwater?

Flush your outboard with fresh water after each trip.

Use a quality “ear muff” style flushing adapter that fits on the lower unit water pick-up (or flushing port when available), and run your engine at idle speed (in neutral) for at least 5 minutes to flush out any salt. Your owner’s manual will give you more information (including important safety precautions) on this procedure.

Wash and wax your outboard engine.

Careful washing with mild soap and water not only makes your outboard look good, but also removes salt and other deposits. An application of a good quality marine wax will help to seal and protect the finish against the sun and salt.

Treat your engine with silicone spray.

Every second or third trip, remove the hood of your outboard (make sure the engine is turned off and cool to the touch) and apply a thin film of silicone spray to the power head. Be sure to use a type of silicone spray that won’t damage rubber and plastic. One of the best for this is CRC brand heavy-duty silicone lubricant, no. 765-1422.

Touch up nicks and scratches in the paint.

Inspect your outboard frequently for nicks and scratches, places where corrosion can get started and spread. Touch up any superficial scratches with a color-matched touch-up paint. On deeper scratches—especially where bare metal is exposed—use a top-quality metal primer first.

Store your engine out of direct sunlight.

The direct ultraviolet rays of the sun can damage the finish and deteriorate the exterior plastic and rubber components. For this reason, it is best to store your engine out of direct sunlight. If direct sunlight is unavoidable, keep the engine shielded with a top-quality, UV-resistant fabric cover while in storage.

Grease key points of your outboard engine.

Your Suzuki comes equipped with special grease fittings to lubricate and prevent corrosion at key points where the engine pivots and swivels. Using a grease gun, apply grease through these fittings regularly, as recommended in your owner’s manual. Also, periodically remove the propeller and apply a film of grease to the propeller shaft.

Replace sacrificial zinc anodes as recommended.

Most outboard engines are equipped with zinc anodes which “sacrifice” themselves in order to protect other metal parts from corrosion. To keep working properly, however, these zinc anodes need to be replaced as recommended in your owner’s manual or once they dwindle to less than 50 percent of their original size. In some extraordinarily corrosive salt water areas, it is wise to add an extra zinc anode below the water line of your boat and bond it to the engine with a quality marine electrical wire. Your dealer can help you decide if this is needed. See your Suzuki accessories catalog for part numbers and further information.

What is the CARB emissions rating for Suzuki Outboards?

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) requires manufacturers to apply environmental emission rating labels to all new outboard engines starting in model year 2001. The Emission label will keep consumers informed when making a purchase decision. California emission regulations are stricter than EPA regulations. They feature 3 levels of “clean” low emission product.

One Star-Low Emission

One Star-Low Emission

The one-star label identifies engines that meet the CARB 2001 exhaust emissions standards. Engines meeting these standards have 75% lower emissions than conventional carbureted 2-stroke engines. These engines are equivalent to U.S. EPA’s 2006 standards for marine engines.

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

The two-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2004 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 20% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

The three-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2008 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 65% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Every Suzuki four-stroke outboard motor already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has earned the 2008 California Air Resource Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions rating.

Do the new DF70/60s meet the EPA emission requirements for 2006?

They not only meet the EPA requirements for 2006, they are twice as clean as they need to be today!

What is a 4 into 2 into 1 Exhaust System?

Suzuki engineers pioneered this exhaust system on the DF115A and DF140A outboard motors. The design increases the low end to mid range torque and provides a wide powerband. With an increased volume of air flowing efficiently into the engine, it becomes necessary to increase the exhaust efficiency as well. The 4 into 2 into 1 exhaust system is cast into the cylinder head and block. This race proven technology reduces drag in the exhaust system allowing for a smooth and orderly flow out of the cylinder head.

Exhaust

What is the CARB emissions rating for Suzuki Outboards?

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) requires manufacturers to apply environmental emission rating labels to all new outboard engines starting in model year 2001. The Emission label will keep consumers informed when making a purchase decision. California emission regulations are stricter than EPA regulations. They feature 3 levels of “clean” low emission product.

One Star-Low Emission

One Star-Low Emission

The one-star label identifies engines that meet the CARB 2001 exhaust emissions standards. Engines meeting these standards have 75% lower emissions than conventional carbureted 2-stroke engines. These engines are equivalent to U.S. EPA’s 2006 standards for marine engines.

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

The two-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2004 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 20% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

The three-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2008 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 65% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Every Suzuki four-stroke outboard motor already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has earned the 2008 California Air Resource Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions rating.

Do the new DF70/60s meet the EPA emission requirements for 2006?

They not only meet the EPA requirements for 2006, they are twice as clean as they need to be today!

What is a 4 into 2 into 1 Exhaust System?

Suzuki engineers pioneered this exhaust system on the DF115A and DF140A outboard motors. The design increases the low end to mid range torque and provides a wide powerband. With an increased volume of air flowing efficiently into the engine, it becomes necessary to increase the exhaust efficiency as well. The 4 into 2 into 1 exhaust system is cast into the cylinder head and block. This race proven technology reduces drag in the exhaust system allowing for a smooth and orderly flow out of the cylinder head.

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

What is sequential multi-point fuel injection?

Sequential multi-point fuel injection constantly supplies the proper fuel/air ratio to each cylinder resulting in improved fuel economy, crisp acceleration and reduced emissions.

What is Variable Valve Timing (VVT)??

The cam shaft(s) in a four stroke engine determines when the valves, both intake and exhaust, open and close. Cam shaft(s) are designed with specific duration (the amount of time the valve is closed) and lift (the height the valve opens). Typically a high performance engine will create the most torque near the top end of a specified RPM range. But an outboard motor also needs to have a strong mid and low end torque range. This is where VVT comes in. By varying the intake valve timing by as much as 40 degrees, the cam shaft timing is optimized for low range and mid range torque. This process is controlled by hydraulic pressure from the oil pump. It is all automatic. All you have to do is go boating. Suzuki variable valve timing is standard on the DF175, 250, 250SS and the 300.

What is Multi-Stage Induction?

Multi-stage induction enhances engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold according to engine RPM. The system utilizes two intake manifold pipes per cylinder, one operating at low RPM and the other operating at high RPM. When the engine is operating a lower RPM, air enters the combustion chamber through the longer curved manifold pipe. The length of the pipe is designed to improve combustion and boost low end torque. As the RPM increases past a threshold, the valve on the direct intake pipe opens, letting air enter directly into the combustion chamber through the short, straight in take pipes. The engine will receive a greater volume of air thus improving the high speed power output. This system is standard on the DF175, 225 and 250.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32 Bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer the adjusts it’s settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

How does the Multi-Stage Induction help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

The DF175 and DF150 incorporate a multi-stage induction system to enhance engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold pipes according to engine speed.

Suzuki Electronic Fuel Injection

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

What is sequential multi-point fuel injection?

Sequential multi-point fuel injection constantly supplies the proper fuel/air ratio to each cylinder resulting in improved fuel economy, crisp acceleration and reduced emissions.

What is Variable Valve Timing (VVT)??

The cam shaft(s) in a four stroke engine determines when the valves, both intake and exhaust, open and close. Cam shaft(s) are designed with specific duration (the amount of time the valve is closed) and lift (the height the valve opens). Typically a high performance engine will create the most torque near the top end of a specified RPM range. But an outboard motor also needs to have a strong mid and low end torque range. This is where VVT comes in. By varying the intake valve timing by as much as 40 degrees, the cam shaft timing is optimized for low range and mid range torque. This process is controlled by hydraulic pressure from the oil pump. It is all automatic. All you have to do is go boating. Suzuki variable valve timing is standard on the DF175, 250, 250SS and the 300.

What is Multi-Stage Induction?

Multi-stage induction enhances engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold according to engine RPM. The system utilizes two intake manifold pipes per cylinder, one operating at low RPM and the other operating at high RPM. When the engine is operating a lower RPM, air enters the combustion chamber through the longer curved manifold pipe. The length of the pipe is designed to improve combustion and boost low end torque. As the RPM increases past a threshold, the valve on the direct intake pipe opens, letting air enter directly into the combustion chamber through the short, straight in take pipes. The engine will receive a greater volume of air thus improving the high speed power output. This system is standard on the DF175, 225 and 250.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32 Bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer the adjusts it’s settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

How does the Multi-Stage Induction help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

The DF175 and DF150 incorporate a multi-stage induction system to enhance engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold pipes according to engine speed.

What is a streamline gear case?

Suzuki’s streamlined gear case has a hydrodynamic design that reduces drag as the lower unit moves through the water. This contributes to faster acceleration, increased fuel economy and top end speed. (DF70A, DF90A, DF250SS, DF250AP, DF300AP)

Why does Suzuki use such a low gear ratio?

Suzuki engineers have verified through countless hours of testing that an outboard propeller with a large diameter will carry a bigger load. Essentially, the large diameter will push more water. Also during the testing, the engineers verified a larger pitch propeller will have less slip. Armed with this information, the engineers have designed Suzuki outboard motors with a large Cubic Inch Displacement, (remember there is no replacement for displacement), light weight and an aggressive final drive ratio. This is why Suzuki can get down with the down low – ratio that is. See specifications for gear ratio.

Lower Unit

What is a streamline gear case?

Suzuki’s streamlined gear case has a hydrodynamic design that reduces drag as the lower unit moves through the water. This contributes to faster acceleration, increased fuel economy and top end speed. (DF70A, DF90A, DF250SS, DF250AP, DF300AP)

Why does Suzuki use such a low gear ratio?

Suzuki engineers have verified through countless hours of testing that an outboard propeller with a large diameter will carry a bigger load. Essentially, the large diameter will push more water. Also during the testing, the engineers verified a larger pitch propeller will have less slip. Armed with this information, the engineers have designed Suzuki outboard motors with a large Cubic Inch Displacement, (remember there is no replacement for displacement), light weight and an aggressive final drive ratio. This is why Suzuki can get down with the down low – ratio that is. See specifications for gear ratio.

How does Suzuki fight saltwater corrosion?

Suzuki uses a basic four-part system to fight the effects of saltwater corrosion, beginning with the use of high-grade aluminum alloys for the engine castings.

Next comes the three-part surface treatment that begins with a thorough chemical cleaning of the casting to eliminate anything that might prevent the adhesion of the surface coatings.

After the chemical cleaning, the parts are submerged in an electrified bath of chromium oxide. The bath changes the make-up of the casting’s surface and creates an invisible barrier that literally becomes a part of the casting.

An extremely hard but resilient epoxy resin primer is baked on. Finally, the castings are given a final coat of urethane marine grade paint. This paint cures to a tough, yet lustrous finish, completely sealing the engine from the saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do zinc anodes help fight corrosion?

Along with Suzuki’s surface treatment, zinc anodes are strategically placed on the outside of the down housing of the lower unit and within the cooling water passages of the engine block. These replaceable anodes take on the brunt of saltwater’s corrosive action, sacrificing themselves over time to preserve the integrity of the engine. Click here for more information.

What other corrosion-fighting features are there?

To prevent galvanic corrosion, key bolts, nuts and washers are also coated with chrome or Dacromate, a specialized corrosion-fighting marine primer that creates a barrier between dissimilar metals. Cylinder head bolts and exhaust cover bolts are chrome-plated for added durability, and exposed portions of stainless steel and tempered steel bolts, nuts and washers are sealed with a final coat of urethane paint.

As a final measure, Suzuki’s one-piece engine hood and baffled air induction system effectively seals the powerhead from saltwater. This comprehensive anti-corrosion system assures you of reliability, durability and corrosion resistance in any saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do I use and care for my outboard engine in saltwater?

Flush your outboard with fresh water after each trip.

Use a quality “ear muff” style flushing adapter that fits on the lower unit water pick-up (or flushing port when available), and run your engine at idle speed (in neutral) for at least 5 minutes to flush out any salt. Your owner’s manual will give you more information (including important safety precautions) on this procedure.

Wash and wax your outboard engine.

Careful washing with mild soap and water not only makes your outboard look good, but also removes salt and other deposits. An application of a good quality marine wax will help to seal and protect the finish against the sun and salt.

Treat your engine with silicone spray.

Every second or third trip, remove the hood of your outboard (make sure the engine is turned off and cool to the touch) and apply a thin film of silicone spray to the power head. Be sure to use a type of silicone spray that won’t damage rubber and plastic. One of the best for this is CRC brand heavy-duty silicone lubricant, no. 765-1422.

Touch up nicks and scratches in the paint.

Inspect your outboard frequently for nicks and scratches, places where corrosion can get started and spread. Touch up any superficial scratches with a color-matched touch-up paint. On deeper scratches—especially where bare metal is exposed—use a top-quality metal primer first.

Store your engine out of direct sunlight.

The direct ultraviolet rays of the sun can damage the finish and deteriorate the exterior plastic and rubber components. For this reason, it is best to store your engine out of direct sunlight. If direct sunlight is unavoidable, keep the engine shielded with a top-quality, UV-resistant fabric cover while in storage.

Grease key points of your outboard engine.

Your Suzuki comes equipped with special grease fittings to lubricate and prevent corrosion at key points where the engine pivots and swivels. Using a grease gun, apply grease through these fittings regularly, as recommended in your owner’s manual. Also, periodically remove the propeller and apply a film of grease to the propeller shaft.

Replace sacrificial zinc anodes as recommended.

Most outboard engines are equipped with zinc anodes which “sacrifice” themselves in order to protect other metal parts from corrosion. To keep working properly, however, these zinc anodes need to be replaced as recommended in your owner’s manual or once they dwindle to less than 50 percent of their original size. In some extraordinarily corrosive salt water areas, it is wise to add an extra zinc anode below the water line of your boat and bond it to the engine with a quality marine electrical wire. Your dealer can help you decide if this is needed. See your Suzuki accessories catalog for part numbers and further information.

Corrosion

How does Suzuki fight saltwater corrosion?

Suzuki uses a basic four-part system to fight the effects of saltwater corrosion, beginning with the use of high-grade aluminum alloys for the engine castings.

Next comes the three-part surface treatment that begins with a thorough chemical cleaning of the casting to eliminate anything that might prevent the adhesion of the surface coatings.

After the chemical cleaning, the parts are submerged in an electrified bath of chromium oxide. The bath changes the make-up of the casting’s surface and creates an invisible barrier that literally becomes a part of the casting.

An extremely hard but resilient epoxy resin primer is baked on. Finally, the castings are given a final coat of urethane marine grade paint. This paint cures to a tough, yet lustrous finish, completely sealing the engine from the saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do zinc anodes help fight corrosion?

Along with Suzuki’s surface treatment, zinc anodes are strategically placed on the outside of the down housing of the lower unit and within the cooling water passages of the engine block. These replaceable anodes take on the brunt of saltwater’s corrosive action, sacrificing themselves over time to preserve the integrity of the engine. Click here for more information.

What other corrosion-fighting features are there?

To prevent galvanic corrosion, key bolts, nuts and washers are also coated with chrome or Dacromate, a specialized corrosion-fighting marine primer that creates a barrier between dissimilar metals. Cylinder head bolts and exhaust cover bolts are chrome-plated for added durability, and exposed portions of stainless steel and tempered steel bolts, nuts and washers are sealed with a final coat of urethane paint.

As a final measure, Suzuki’s one-piece engine hood and baffled air induction system effectively seals the powerhead from saltwater. This comprehensive anti-corrosion system assures you of reliability, durability and corrosion resistance in any saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do I use and care for my outboard engine in saltwater?

Flush your outboard with fresh water after each trip.

Use a quality “ear muff” style flushing adapter that fits on the lower unit water pick-up (or flushing port when available), and run your engine at idle speed (in neutral) for at least 5 minutes to flush out any salt. Your owner’s manual will give you more information (including important safety precautions) on this procedure.

Wash and wax your outboard engine.

Careful washing with mild soap and water not only makes your outboard look good, but also removes salt and other deposits. An application of a good quality marine wax will help to seal and protect the finish against the sun and salt.

Treat your engine with silicone spray.

Every second or third trip, remove the hood of your outboard (make sure the engine is turned off and cool to the touch) and apply a thin film of silicone spray to the power head. Be sure to use a type of silicone spray that won’t damage rubber and plastic. One of the best for this is CRC brand heavy-duty silicone lubricant, no. 765-1422.

Touch up nicks and scratches in the paint.

Inspect your outboard frequently for nicks and scratches, places where corrosion can get started and spread. Touch up any superficial scratches with a color-matched touch-up paint. On deeper scratches—especially where bare metal is exposed—use a top-quality metal primer first.

Store your engine out of direct sunlight.

The direct ultraviolet rays of the sun can damage the finish and deteriorate the exterior plastic and rubber components. For this reason, it is best to store your engine out of direct sunlight. If direct sunlight is unavoidable, keep the engine shielded with a top-quality, UV-resistant fabric cover while in storage.

Grease key points of your outboard engine.

Your Suzuki comes equipped with special grease fittings to lubricate and prevent corrosion at key points where the engine pivots and swivels. Using a grease gun, apply grease through these fittings regularly, as recommended in your owner’s manual. Also, periodically remove the propeller and apply a film of grease to the propeller shaft.

Replace sacrificial zinc anodes as recommended.

Most outboard engines are equipped with zinc anodes which “sacrifice” themselves in order to protect other metal parts from corrosion. To keep working properly, however, these zinc anodes need to be replaced as recommended in your owner’s manual or once they dwindle to less than 50 percent of their original size. In some extraordinarily corrosive salt water areas, it is wise to add an extra zinc anode below the water line of your boat and bond it to the engine with a quality marine electrical wire. Your dealer can help you decide if this is needed. See your Suzuki accessories catalog for part numbers and further information.

What does “digital” mean?

Digital is the way computers process information, using combinations of binary digits, either zero or one. Digital coding can represent any given value as a coded number (for example, the ideal amount of air in relationship to the amount of fuel at a certain throttle setting). And, because the range of values that can be represented is infinite, digital codes allow exceptionally high precision. By using a small computer to “manage” an engine with digital codes for all of the various aspects of engine operation, such as fuel-to-air ratio, load and air temperature, engineers are able to design engines that run better, deliver better fuel economy and reduce emissions.

The opposite of digital is analog. Carburetors are analog instruments. Their actuation is mechanical and must be preset to adjust for specific operating conditions. Electronic fuel injection, used on Suzuki outboards, is digital and provides virtually infinite settings to ensure ideal combustion in any conditions.

A personal computer is digital. An abacus is analog.

How will digital affect the marine industry?

Electronic fuel injection system (EFI) can be found on most of the automobiles on the road today. Because of the benefits of EFI—easier starting, better fuel economy and smoother power delivery–it is only a matter of time until this technology finds its way into common usage on all other internal combustion engines, such as motorcycles, snowmobiles and outboards.

Suzuki pioneered the use of digitally controlled EFI in the marine business. Suzuki’s advanced system monitors changing conditions on the water and in the motor, and instantly responds to changes in throttle setting, atmospheric pressure, temperature and engine speed by adjusting the air/fuel mixture to meet changing conditions.

The benefit to you is an outboard motor that starts instantly in all weather conditions, runs cleaner and has quicker and crisper throttle response under all types of loads. It also means your engine will run as well at sea level as it will at Lake Shasta. Digital EFI is standard on all Suzuki Outboard motors from DF40-DF300.

Where will digital technology go?

Digital technology is all around us. We first saw it in computers, and it has since moved into consumer electronics in CDs, digital compact cassettes, digital cellular communications and not to mention all of the new TV screens with High-Definition TV (HDTV). The automotive industry has been using it for years, first in exotic high-powered sports cars and now in the most mundane people hauler.

As time rolls on, we’re sure to see digital technology improving more and more aspects of our lives.

What is a 32 Bit ECM?

The ECM (Engine Control Module) constantly monitors crucial data from a series of sensors placed in critical areas on the engine. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor, Crankshaft Position Sensor, Intake Air Temperature Sensor and Exhaust Jacket Temperature Sensor. Using a very powerful 32-bit computer, the ECM processes data from all of these sensors and instantly calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each cylinder via the multi point sequential fuel injection system. Benefits from this system include reduced exhaust emissions, lower fuel consumption, smooth starts, crisper acceleration, smoother performance and maximum efficiency.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32-bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer adjusts its settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

What is a monitor gauge system?

What is a monitor gauge system?

It’s a light, it’s a buzzer, it’s a system that Suzuki pioneered over 20 years ago that can save your engine, your wallet and your day. Suzuki’s Digital ignition systems are complemented by an engine monitoring system that keeps the operator constantly informed of vital engine functions. In the event one or more sensors detect the following:

1. A higher than normal water temperature
2. An over rev condition
3. An low oil pressurer
4. And a convenient oil change reminder

the operator is alerted to the potential problem with a light, a buzzer and a reduction in engine rpm. The oil change reminder does not lower the RPM, but the gauge will light up and the buzzer will continue to beep until the reset. The Monitor gauge is designed for the DF40-300. (See your local Suzuki Marine dealer or read your owners manual)

What is IAC Valve and what does it do?

An IAC (Idle Air Control) valve is found on the Suzuki DF40-DF300. This valve, which is also found in all of our fuel-injected automobiles, maintains a constant idle speed by regulating the amount of air that enters the intake system. The use of an IAC enables these engines to maintain a steady and consistent idle speed.

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

Digital

What does “digital” mean?

Digital is the way computers process information, using combinations of binary digits, either zero or one. Digital coding can represent any given value as a coded number (for example, the ideal amount of air in relationship to the amount of fuel at a certain throttle setting). And, because the range of values that can be represented is infinite, digital codes allow exceptionally high precision. By using a small computer to “manage” an engine with digital codes for all of the various aspects of engine operation, such as fuel-to-air ratio, load and air temperature, engineers are able to design engines that run better, deliver better fuel economy and reduce emissions.

The opposite of digital is analog. Carburetors are analog instruments. Their actuation is mechanical and must be preset to adjust for specific operating conditions. Electronic fuel injection, used on Suzuki outboards, is digital and provides virtually infinite settings to ensure ideal combustion in any conditions.

A personal computer is digital. An abacus is analog.

How will digital affect the marine industry?

Electronic fuel injection system (EFI) can be found on most of the automobiles on the road today. Because of the benefits of EFI—easier starting, better fuel economy and smoother power delivery–it is only a matter of time until this technology finds its way into common usage on all other internal combustion engines, such as motorcycles, snowmobiles and outboards.

Suzuki pioneered the use of digitally controlled EFI in the marine business. Suzuki’s advanced system monitors changing conditions on the water and in the motor, and instantly responds to changes in throttle setting, atmospheric pressure, temperature and engine speed by adjusting the air/fuel mixture to meet changing conditions.

The benefit to you is an outboard motor that starts instantly in all weather conditions, runs cleaner and has quicker and crisper throttle response under all types of loads. It also means your engine will run as well at sea level as it will at Lake Shasta. Digital EFI is standard on all Suzuki Outboard motors from DF40-DF300.

Where will digital technology go?

Digital technology is all around us. We first saw it in computers, and it has since moved into consumer electronics in CDs, digital compact cassettes, digital cellular communications and not to mention all of the new TV screens with High-Definition TV (HDTV). The automotive industry has been using it for years, first in exotic high-powered sports cars and now in the most mundane people hauler.

As time rolls on, we’re sure to see digital technology improving more and more aspects of our lives.

What is a 32 Bit ECM?

The ECM (Engine Control Module) constantly monitors crucial data from a series of sensors placed in critical areas on the engine. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor, Crankshaft Position Sensor, Intake Air Temperature Sensor and Exhaust Jacket Temperature Sensor. Using a very powerful 32-bit computer, the ECM processes data from all of these sensors and instantly calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each cylinder via the multi point sequential fuel injection system. Benefits from this system include reduced exhaust emissions, lower fuel consumption, smooth starts, crisper acceleration, smoother performance and maximum efficiency.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32-bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer adjusts its settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

What is a monitor gauge system?

What is a monitor gauge system?

It’s a light, it’s a buzzer, it’s a system that Suzuki pioneered over 20 years ago that can save your engine, your wallet and your day. Suzuki’s Digital ignition systems are complemented by an engine monitoring system that keeps the operator constantly informed of vital engine functions. In the event one or more sensors detect the following:

1. A higher than normal water temperature
2. An over rev condition
3. An low oil pressurer
4. And a convenient oil change reminder

the operator is alerted to the potential problem with a light, a buzzer and a reduction in engine rpm. The oil change reminder does not lower the RPM, but the gauge will light up and the buzzer will continue to beep until the reset. The Monitor gauge is designed for the DF40-300. (See your local Suzuki Marine dealer or read your owners manual)

What is IAC Valve and what does it do?

An IAC (Idle Air Control) valve is found on the Suzuki DF40-DF300. This valve, which is also found in all of our fuel-injected automobiles, maintains a constant idle speed by regulating the amount of air that enters the intake system. The use of an IAC enables these engines to maintain a steady and consistent idle speed.

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

What is Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology?

Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology

Four-stroke engines are clearly the dominate force in marine outboard power. When done right, they’re cleaner, quieter, more efficient and more economical than a comparable two-stroke. Over the years, Suzuki has built millions of four-stroke automobile and motorcycle engines, which makes it easy for us to transfer all that proven know-how to an outboard motor. Our commitment to technology means you get better value from our outboards with better fuel economy, improved reliability, and exciting performance. And that is why Suzuki is able to offer the most advanced four-stroke outboard motors on the market today.

The Evolution Continues

What do we mean by “most advanced”? Well, our digital sequential fuel injection reduces fuel consumption by 75% compared to an equal displacement two-stroke, and by 30% when compared to competitive four-stroke outboards. Suzuki’s fully-transistorized direct ignition, the first in outboard power, ensures first-time starts and maximum power, and helps prevent misfires. The tuned intake manifold boosts low- to mid-range performance for quicker acceleration. The cooling system uses a thermostat to maintain optimum operating temperature for maximum engine efficiency.

You’ll find similar combinations of proven automotive and marine technologies in our new portable DF30/25 models and portable 15 and 9.9 horsepower four-strokes as well.

And every Suzuki four-stroke already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has also earned the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions Rating.

A Closer Look

No one else can match the engineering found on Suzuki Outboard engines. And here’s why:

  • The DF25 is unique in the fact that it utilizes a single-cam, 3-valve head design (two intake valves, one exhaust valve). This design, when used in combination with a 538cc displacement (with a bore and stroke of 71mm x 68mm), provides greater output and low-end torque, resulting in outboards that are easier to handle, even at lower speeds.
  • An in-line, three-cylinder, automotive-type engine was utilized in the design of the DF50/40 Suzuki. Components such as valves, valve springs, tappets, sprockets, timing chain and fuel filter are all identical to those used in Suzuki automotive engines. Because of the different operating conditions and environment, however, the engines have been given a larger bore and longer stroke to provide maximum power in a marine application. Critical structural parts have been redesigned for marine use, such as the cylinder head, block, crankshaft, connecting rods, camshafts and pistons, to provide maximum reliability and durable operation. Metal gaskets have also been employed in critical areas.
  • The DF50/40, on the other hand, uses a Dual Over Head Camshaft (DOHC) cylinder head, featuring four valves for each cylinder. This compact, modern head utilizes a Pent Roof design, which allows for closer placement of the intake and exhaust valves, helping to optimize combustion efficiency. A center-positioned spark plug and high-compression ratio are also incorporated to maximize engine performance.
  • The DF50/40 were the first outboard motors to be equipped with an enclosed, oil-bathed timing chain, which is kept in check with an automatic hydraulic tensioner. Highly durable, the system will provide owners with years of maintenance-free operation.
  • A crankshaft-driven lubrication system with a trochoid type oil pump is used in all of Suzuki’s bigger four-strokes. With the inclusion of a cartridge type oil filter, the durability of the crank journal and big end have been greatly improved. The oil drain is positioned on the front side of the engine, making oil changes easier, and allows for easy servicing in the full tilt position.
  • The long-track intake manifolds utilized on Suzuki’s DF40-70 models are made of a special corrosion-resistant plastic, and are designed to increase the velocity of the fuel-air mix for more power and quieter operation. In addition, this style of air intake system reduces changes in air temperature and helps to increase power, as well as acting as a large-volume silencer to reduce engine noise levels.
  • The solid-state ignition system found on the DF40-70 models provide twice as much power to the spark plug, allowing for cleaner, more complete combustion, maximizing power with every stroke.
  • The Digital CDI utilized on the DF4, 6, and 25 provides precise control of engine performance. Sensors providing engine rpm and temperature data in real-time allow the unit’s computer to instantly determine optimum engine timing. The results are smooth operation at low speed, powerful acceleration, and stable operation at high speed.
  • The DF40, 50, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 250SS and 300 features a “direct ignition” system, which is more compact and simpler in design because it uses fewer parts than conventional ignition systems. The ignition coils are integrated within the spark plug caps, simplifying the wiring system and greatly reducing electronic engine “noise,” which can interfere with VHF radios, fishfinders and other marine electronics.
  • Suzuki High output alternators will keep your electronics humming.
  • An advanced computer diagnostic system allows dealership technicians to quickly troubleshoot the DF40-300 models, thus reducing diagnostic time.

The Heart of the Matter

One of the most important features found on the Suzuki DF40-300 models is the Sequential Multi-Point Digital EFI system. Improved fuel economy and optimum power are achieved through the constant monitoring of engine and operating conditions by way of highly-advanced computer-control. With this particular electronic fuel injection system these outboards are able to pass future emission regulations today while providing lower fuel consumption, easier starting, better drivability and outstanding throttle response.

The E.C.M. (Engine Control Module) system incorporated into these models controls the engines’ ignition system and also provides an ideal fuel supply under all running conditions. The E.C.M. constantly monitors crucial data, in real time, from a series of sensors placed in critical areas in the engine. The sensor system is made up of M.A.P. (Manifold Absolute Pressure), Engine RPM Sensor, Air Intake Temperature Sensor, Exhaust Manifold Temperature Sensor and Cylinder Wall Temperature Sensor. The data from these sensors is conveyed to a computer which instantly calculates (Speed-Density type) the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each of the cylinders.

Also incorporated on these models are the Idle Air Control, a Fast Idle function and a Dash Pot System to provide stable engine operation at all times. The I.A.C. is programmed to let the engine idle at a low rpm. Regulating intake air under different running conditions, intake air is increased when the engine’s rpm is too low, and decreased when rpm is too high.

A Fast Idle Function provides quick starts and smooth, stable engine warmups. When the engine is started, the I.A.C. valve fully opens to let an increased flow of air into the cylinder.

Suzuki’s Dash Pot System is of an electronic type; other manufacturers generally use mechanical systems. The Electronic Dash Pot System only functions when there is a sudden throttle transition, from open to closed, smoothly reducing rpm to lessen stress on the engine.

Although common in automotive applications, Suzuki was the first to incorporate a Solid State Full Transistor Digital Ignition System into an outboard engine application. This system taps into voltage supplied by the battery, enabling it to increase spark duration regardless of engine speed—a nine-fold increase compared to spark duration produced by conventional CDI units. The result is a doubling of spark strength. Compared to conventional CDI units, it is controlled with only 1/10th the voltage. The circuit design is simplified and creates more energy and a longer fuel burn, therefore increasing durability and reliability.

The Bottom Line

No other outboard manufacturer has more knowledge about engines than Suzuki. We’ve been building engines for automobiles, motorcycles and outboards for decades. Our technical resources are enormous. Suzuki is the largest corporation manufacturing a full line of outboard motors. We know the technology inside and out; we know it works. Our innovation is based on experience and good old fashioned know how.

What does custom performance mean?

Boating is not a one-size-fits-all activity. Requirements for various aspects not only require different types of boats, but also motors with different types of power deliveries and other characteristics. As an example, in the real world of bass fishing, you have lightning-fast hole shots, wide-open throttle runs, and then long sit-and-fish periods. Suzuki’s DF250SS is engineered to provide maximum performance under just these conditions. In addition to electronic fuel injection, it features a 4.0 liter Big Block V6 Four-Stroke engine with Variable Valve Timing, Multi Stage Induction, Forge Pistons, Offset Drive Shaft, Two Stage DOHC, Streamlined Gear Case, 32 Bit computer, Direct Ignition, High Output Alternator, Regulated Dual Charging System, Tilt Limit Switch and Dual Engine Flush Ports. This outboard will flat-out get with the program.

On the other hand, offshore fishing requires an engine capable of making long runs at mid-range throttle settings, going out to where the fish are and then spending hours at low trolling speeds. Suzuki’s Offshore DF200, 225, 250 and 300 V6 outboards are engineered to power fishing boats and offshore cruisers. These engines provide exceptional mid-range torque and are programmed for maximum performance and efficiency during lengthy cruises or long trolling sessions. These outboards offer all of the advantages of Suzuki’s 4-stroke technology, such as superior fuel economy, quiet, low vibration and environmentally friendly operation all while providing impressive performance and rock-solid reliability.

Don’t over look any of the awesome Suzuki 4-stroke outboards we have to offer. From the mighty mite DF2.5 all the way up to our Flag Ship DF300, we have the power you want.

How powerful a motor do I really need?

When it comes to choosing an outboard motor, today’s buyer is faced with a dizzying array of choices. Working with a knowledgeable dealer who listens to what you have to say is the best way to make the right decisions. A dealer can help you match the right amount of power to your specific boating needs. By taking into account factors such as hull weight, frequency of use, horsepower rating and, of course, budget, you and your dealer can put together a boat and motor package that makes sense.

Why a 55-degree V6?

A 55-degree bank angle creates a compact V6 outboard motor. The DF200, 225, 250, 250SS and DF300 all have a 55-degree block. Suzuki Engineers designed an all-new 55-degree V-Block, an industry first! This design is narrower, allowing the V6 engines to be mounted on 26″ centers; great news for people who want to repower an older boat – most other outboard brands in this HP category will have to be mounted on 28″, or greater, centers.

What is DOHC and why is it important for me and my outboard motor?

DOHC stands for “Dual Over Head Camshaft” cylinder head design. This design uses two separate camshafts: one for the intake and the other for the exhaust valves. This efficient head design, in conjunction with 4 valves per cylinder, enables Suzuki engineers to get the maximum power and economy while the physical engine size is kept compact and light.

How come my new Suzuki Outboard doesn’t have any spark plug wires?

The DF40,50,70,80,90,150,175,200,225,250,250SS and DF300 feature another Suzuki industry first—Direct Ignition. Adapted from our automotive division, this unique system incorporates the ignition coil right in the spark plug cap! This reduces the number of parts and simplifies the wiring system as well as reducing the effect of radio frequency interference on your onboard electronics.

How much charging capacity do I need?

Suzuki Outboards have been designed with high output alternators to provide ample power for engine & onboard electronics, even at low rpm. All V6 models (DF200-DF300) have 54 amp alternators that will output a full 38 amps at 1000 RPMs. The Big Block 150/175 are equipped with 44 amp alternators and will output over 35 amps at 1000 RPMs. This is enough power to keep an assortment of electronics up and running.

Why is an Offset Drive Shaft better?

The Suzuki offset drive shaft positions the powerhead forward of the drive shaft for improved balance and less vibration on the transom. This proven design makes for a compact engine and places the axis of inertia, the point where vibrations produced, are at a minimum. This design is incorporated in the DF70 through 300.

What is Big Block Displacement?

The Suzuki 4 cylinder DOHC 2.867 liter DF150/175 has the largest displacement in this class. It is also the most compact in its class. Smaller on the outside, yet the inside has more displacement than a competitor’s 6 cylinder models. The Suzuki V-6 DOHC 200/225/250 models are 3.6 liter and are the largest displacement and most compact in their class. The list just keeps growing. Remember, “There is no Replacement for Displacement”.

How does a Counter Balancer System help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

In-line four-cylinder engines operating at high RPM generates a secondary vibration that is directly in line with the piston’s movement. In order to counter this vibration, suzuki engineers utilize a secondary balancer system, which produces a horizontal motion against the piston’s movement. To produce this horizontal motion, the balancer is divided into left and right sections, each rotating in an opposite direction. Rotating at twice the speed of the crankshaft, the balancers effectively counter these secondary vibrations and produce a smoother operating engine.

What is the Thrust Mount System?

On both the upper and lower mounts, a combination of soft and high thrust rubber bushings are utilized to absorb vibration and improve performance. This system is utilized on the DF70 through DF300.

Engine

What is Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology?

Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology

Four-stroke engines are clearly the dominate force in marine outboard power. When done right, they’re cleaner, quieter, more efficient and more economical than a comparable two-stroke. Over the years, Suzuki has built millions of four-stroke automobile and motorcycle engines, which makes it easy for us to transfer all that proven know-how to an outboard motor. Our commitment to technology means you get better value from our outboards with better fuel economy, improved reliability, and exciting performance. And that is why Suzuki is able to offer the most advanced four-stroke outboard motors on the market today.

The Evolution Continues

What do we mean by “most advanced”? Well, our digital sequential fuel injection reduces fuel consumption by 75% compared to an equal displacement two-stroke, and by 30% when compared to competitive four-stroke outboards. Suzuki’s fully-transistorized direct ignition, the first in outboard power, ensures first-time starts and maximum power, and helps prevent misfires. The tuned intake manifold boosts low- to mid-range performance for quicker acceleration. The cooling system uses a thermostat to maintain optimum operating temperature for maximum engine efficiency.

You’ll find similar combinations of proven automotive and marine technologies in our new portable DF30/25 models and portable 15 and 9.9 horsepower four-strokes as well.

And every Suzuki four-stroke already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has also earned the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions Rating.

A Closer Look

No one else can match the engineering found on Suzuki Outboard engines. And here’s why:

  • The DF25 is unique in the fact that it utilizes a single-cam, 3-valve head design (two intake valves, one exhaust valve). This design, when used in combination with a 538cc displacement (with a bore and stroke of 71mm x 68mm), provides greater output and low-end torque, resulting in outboards that are easier to handle, even at lower speeds.
  • An in-line, three-cylinder, automotive-type engine was utilized in the design of the DF50/40 Suzuki. Components such as valves, valve springs, tappets, sprockets, timing chain and fuel filter are all identical to those used in Suzuki automotive engines. Because of the different operating conditions and environment, however, the engines have been given a larger bore and longer stroke to provide maximum power in a marine application. Critical structural parts have been redesigned for marine use, such as the cylinder head, block, crankshaft, connecting rods, camshafts and pistons, to provide maximum reliability and durable operation. Metal gaskets have also been employed in critical areas.
  • The DF50/40, on the other hand, uses a Dual Over Head Camshaft (DOHC) cylinder head, featuring four valves for each cylinder. This compact, modern head utilizes a Pent Roof design, which allows for closer placement of the intake and exhaust valves, helping to optimize combustion efficiency. A center-positioned spark plug and high-compression ratio are also incorporated to maximize engine performance.
  • The DF50/40 were the first outboard motors to be equipped with an enclosed, oil-bathed timing chain, which is kept in check with an automatic hydraulic tensioner. Highly durable, the system will provide owners with years of maintenance-free operation.
  • A crankshaft-driven lubrication system with a trochoid type oil pump is used in all of Suzuki’s bigger four-strokes. With the inclusion of a cartridge type oil filter, the durability of the crank journal and big end have been greatly improved. The oil drain is positioned on the front side of the engine, making oil changes easier, and allows for easy servicing in the full tilt position.
  • The long-track intake manifolds utilized on Suzuki’s DF40-70 models are made of a special corrosion-resistant plastic, and are designed to increase the velocity of the fuel-air mix for more power and quieter operation. In addition, this style of air intake system reduces changes in air temperature and helps to increase power, as well as acting as a large-volume silencer to reduce engine noise levels.
  • The solid-state ignition system found on the DF40-70 models provide twice as much power to the spark plug, allowing for cleaner, more complete combustion, maximizing power with every stroke.
  • The Digital CDI utilized on the DF4, 6, and 25 provides precise control of engine performance. Sensors providing engine rpm and temperature data in real-time allow the unit’s computer to instantly determine optimum engine timing. The results are smooth operation at low speed, powerful acceleration, and stable operation at high speed.
  • The DF40, 50, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 250SS and 300 features a “direct ignition” system, which is more compact and simpler in design because it uses fewer parts than conventional ignition systems. The ignition coils are integrated within the spark plug caps, simplifying the wiring system and greatly reducing electronic engine “noise,” which can interfere with VHF radios, fishfinders and other marine electronics.
  • Suzuki High output alternators will keep your electronics humming.
  • An advanced computer diagnostic system allows dealership technicians to quickly troubleshoot the DF40-300 models, thus reducing diagnostic time.

The Heart of the Matter

One of the most important features found on the Suzuki DF40-300 models is the Sequential Multi-Point Digital EFI system. Improved fuel economy and optimum power are achieved through the constant monitoring of engine and operating conditions by way of highly-advanced computer-control. With this particular electronic fuel injection system these outboards are able to pass future emission regulations today while providing lower fuel consumption, easier starting, better drivability and outstanding throttle response.

The E.C.M. (Engine Control Module) system incorporated into these models controls the engines’ ignition system and also provides an ideal fuel supply under all running conditions. The E.C.M. constantly monitors crucial data, in real time, from a series of sensors placed in critical areas in the engine. The sensor system is made up of M.A.P. (Manifold Absolute Pressure), Engine RPM Sensor, Air Intake Temperature Sensor, Exhaust Manifold Temperature Sensor and Cylinder Wall Temperature Sensor. The data from these sensors is conveyed to a computer which instantly calculates (Speed-Density type) the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each of the cylinders.

Also incorporated on these models are the Idle Air Control, a Fast Idle function and a Dash Pot System to provide stable engine operation at all times. The I.A.C. is programmed to let the engine idle at a low rpm. Regulating intake air under different running conditions, intake air is increased when the engine’s rpm is too low, and decreased when rpm is too high.

A Fast Idle Function provides quick starts and smooth, stable engine warmups. When the engine is started, the I.A.C. valve fully opens to let an increased flow of air into the cylinder.

Suzuki’s Dash Pot System is of an electronic type; other manufacturers generally use mechanical systems. The Electronic Dash Pot System only functions when there is a sudden throttle transition, from open to closed, smoothly reducing rpm to lessen stress on the engine.

Although common in automotive applications, Suzuki was the first to incorporate a Solid State Full Transistor Digital Ignition System into an outboard engine application. This system taps into voltage supplied by the battery, enabling it to increase spark duration regardless of engine speed—a nine-fold increase compared to spark duration produced by conventional CDI units. The result is a doubling of spark strength. Compared to conventional CDI units, it is controlled with only 1/10th the voltage. The circuit design is simplified and creates more energy and a longer fuel burn, therefore increasing durability and reliability.

The Bottom Line

No other outboard manufacturer has more knowledge about engines than Suzuki. We’ve been building engines for automobiles, motorcycles and outboards for decades. Our technical resources are enormous. Suzuki is the largest corporation manufacturing a full line of outboard motors. We know the technology inside and out; we know it works. Our innovation is based on experience and good old fashioned know how.

What does custom performance mean?

Boating is not a one-size-fits-all activity. Requirements for various aspects not only require different types of boats, but also motors with different types of power deliveries and other characteristics. As an example, in the real world of bass fishing, you have lightning-fast hole shots, wide-open throttle runs, and then long sit-and-fish periods. Suzuki’s DF250SS is engineered to provide maximum performance under just these conditions. In addition to electronic fuel injection, it features a 4.0 liter Big Block V6 Four-Stroke engine with Variable Valve Timing, Multi Stage Induction, Forge Pistons, Offset Drive Shaft, Two Stage DOHC, Streamlined Gear Case, 32 Bit computer, Direct Ignition, High Output Alternator, Regulated Dual Charging System, Tilt Limit Switch and Dual Engine Flush Ports. This outboard will flat-out get with the program.

On the other hand, offshore fishing requires an engine capable of making long runs at mid-range throttle settings, going out to where the fish are and then spending hours at low trolling speeds. Suzuki’s Offshore DF200, 225, 250 and 300 V6 outboards are engineered to power fishing boats and offshore cruisers. These engines provide exceptional mid-range torque and are programmed for maximum performance and efficiency during lengthy cruises or long trolling sessions. These outboards offer all of the advantages of Suzuki’s 4-stroke technology, such as superior fuel economy, quiet, low vibration and environmentally friendly operation all while providing impressive performance and rock-solid reliability.

Don’t over look any of the awesome Suzuki 4-stroke outboards we have to offer. From the mighty mite DF2.5 all the way up to our Flag Ship DF300, we have the power you want.

How powerful a motor do I really need?

When it comes to choosing an outboard motor, today’s buyer is faced with a dizzying array of choices. Working with a knowledgeable dealer who listens to what you have to say is the best way to make the right decisions. A dealer can help you match the right amount of power to your specific boating needs. By taking into account factors such as hull weight, frequency of use, horsepower rating and, of course, budget, you and your dealer can put together a boat and motor package that makes sense.

Why a 55-degree V6?

A 55-degree bank angle creates a compact V6 outboard motor. The DF200, 225, 250, 250SS and DF300 all have a 55-degree block. Suzuki Engineers designed an all-new 55-degree V-Block, an industry first! This design is narrower, allowing the V6 engines to be mounted on 26″ centers; great news for people who want to repower an older boat – most other outboard brands in this HP category will have to be mounted on 28″, or greater, centers.

What is DOHC and why is it important for me and my outboard motor?

DOHC stands for “Dual Over Head Camshaft” cylinder head design. This design uses two separate camshafts: one for the intake and the other for the exhaust valves. This efficient head design, in conjunction with 4 valves per cylinder, enables Suzuki engineers to get the maximum power and economy while the physical engine size is kept compact and light.

How come my new Suzuki Outboard doesn’t have any spark plug wires?

The DF40,50,70,80,90,150,175,200,225,250,250SS and DF300 feature another Suzuki industry first—Direct Ignition. Adapted from our automotive division, this unique system incorporates the ignition coil right in the spark plug cap! This reduces the number of parts and simplifies the wiring system as well as reducing the effect of radio frequency interference on your onboard electronics.

How much charging capacity do I need?

Suzuki Outboards have been designed with high output alternators to provide ample power for engine & onboard electronics, even at low rpm. All V6 models (DF200-DF300) have 54 amp alternators that will output a full 38 amps at 1000 RPMs. The Big Block 150/175 are equipped with 44 amp alternators and will output over 35 amps at 1000 RPMs. This is enough power to keep an assortment of electronics up and running.

Why is an Offset Drive Shaft better?

The Suzuki offset drive shaft positions the powerhead forward of the drive shaft for improved balance and less vibration on the transom. This proven design makes for a compact engine and places the axis of inertia, the point where vibrations produced, are at a minimum. This design is incorporated in the DF70 through 300.

What is Big Block Displacement?

The Suzuki 4 cylinder DOHC 2.867 liter DF150/175 has the largest displacement in this class. It is also the most compact in its class. Smaller on the outside, yet the inside has more displacement than a competitor’s 6 cylinder models. The Suzuki V-6 DOHC 200/225/250 models are 3.6 liter and are the largest displacement and most compact in their class. The list just keeps growing. Remember, “There is no Replacement for Displacement”.

How does a Counter Balancer System help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

In-line four-cylinder engines operating at high RPM generates a secondary vibration that is directly in line with the piston’s movement. In order to counter this vibration, suzuki engineers utilize a secondary balancer system, which produces a horizontal motion against the piston’s movement. To produce this horizontal motion, the balancer is divided into left and right sections, each rotating in an opposite direction. Rotating at twice the speed of the crankshaft, the balancers effectively counter these secondary vibrations and produce a smoother operating engine.

What is the Thrust Mount System?

On both the upper and lower mounts, a combination of soft and high thrust rubber bushings are utilized to absorb vibration and improve performance. This system is utilized on the DF70 through DF300.

Why stainless steel props?

Stainless steel propellers provide increased durability and performance over aluminum propellers. Suzuki offers an incredible selection of Genuine Suzuki Stainless Steel Props for almost every application. Make sure to check out the Accessory section.

What is an externally mounted tilt switch and why do I need one?

Imagine this: You are at the launch ramp and are about to float your boat. The engine rests on the transom saver/trailering bracket. If you own a Suzuki outboard 40 horsepower and up, you won’t have to climb into the boat to tilt your engine up to remove the trailering bracket. Conveniently located on the side of the engine is a switch that allows for easy raising and lowering of the engine.

What does Model Year Elimination mean and how does it affect my Suzuki Outboard

We have studied the actions of the other major outboard manufacturers and now believe that Model Year Elimination will offer a host of benefits to our Customers, Dealers and Boat Builders. Suzuki Marine can now introduce new outboard models to the market during the boating season, instead of waiting until the model year change. Consumers will be able to purchase these models sooner than in the past. Dealers and Boat Builders will carry a better supply of outboards because they will not have to reduce inventory in advance of a Model Year Change.

How can I get in touch with the Suzuki Marine Customer Relations department?

IF YOU HAVE A CUSTOMER SERVICE INQUIRY:

A) Use the Dealer Locator tool to locate your nearest Suzuki Dealer or

B) Should you have a situation that you believe requires Suzuki’s immediate assistance, you may call Customer Service at (813) 687-5900 or email us at MarineCR@suz.com. Customer service representatives are available from 8:30am – 5:00pm EST. Or

C) Put your inquiry in a letter, including copies of all relevant documents (service records, etc.). Include the Outboard Model, 6-digit vehicle Identification Number (VIN), your full name, mailing address, and day/evening phone numbers to:

Suzuki Marine USA – Customer Service
P.O. BOX 262529
Tampa, FL 33635

Customer service inquiries for Suzuki Motor Vehicles usually involve documents which cannot be handled effectively via email. Therefore, inquiries which cannot be answered by your local dealer, should be submitted via U.S. mail. Please be advised that most customer service inquiries can be handled by your local Suzuki Marine dealer who is familiar with your area and your Outboard Motor.

We have found that speaking with a trained customer service representative eliminates misunderstandings, which are commonly encountered with email communication. We also know that situations can be resolved quickly when all the relevant facts, events and details are discussed in a thorough manner. It is essential to have your facts organized and available before calling us. This will speed the resolution process. Relevant information would include the following: model, vehicle Identification Number (VIN), date of purchase, selling and servicing dealer, names of staff you have already approached plus a summary of your needs and expectations.

How do I know if the Suzuki Outboard is the newest model

Here is an example to determine the newest model for a 70hp Suzuki outboard: The model designator for a first generation (built from 1998 – 2008) 70 horse-power engine was DF70TL. The replacement model is now a DF70ATL. Note the A designates the Next Generation Suzuki Marine’s newest model in the 70 horse-power category. In addition, the Suzuki Marine web site will promote the newest models available.

When will the warranty clock start ticking on my Suzuki Outboard

The warranty clock starts when a customer purchases a Suzuki Outboard Motor and the dealer retail registers the unit with Suzuki Marine. It makes no difference when the engine was manufactured. The standard warranty for a new Suzuki Outboard is as follows: 5 year limited warranty for Non-Commercial use. 1 year warranty for either Commercial use or Rental use.

I live in an outboard titling state (Missouri, Ohio, South Carolina, Utah or Texas). What will I need to register my new Suzuki Outboard Motor?

When a new Suzuki Outboard Motor is sold wholesale to a Boat Builder or Dealer, a MCO (Manufacturers Certificate of Origin) is mailed to the invoiced party. The MCO is an original title for the Suzuki Outboard Motor and the Manufacture Date will be used to date the engine. When the unit is sold at retail, the dealership should have this form on file. Each state titling method is a little different, so please refer to your local agency for the most up to date process.

What do I need to know about transferring the Suzuki Limited Warranty when I sell my motor?

Five things are required to transfer a warranty:

  • You must be the original owner.
  • The warranty transfer must be completed within 30 days of sale.
  • Make sure the motor has not previously been registered as a commercial or rental motor.
  • Of course, the motor must have remaining unused time on the warranty.
  • The new owner needs to show a Suzuki Marine dealer that the motor, its installation and maintenance have been done as prescribed in the owner’s manual and that no pre-existing, uncorrected conditions exist that may result in damage to a warrantable system or part.

Contact your local Suzuki Marine dealership for all details concerning the Suzuki Limited Warranty. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

How can I positively identify the exact model of a Suzuki outboard motor?

The manufacturer’s identification tag is found on the motor mount bracket, usually on the starboard (right) side of the engine. It lists all of the key information. Write down the information on the model designator–including all prefixes and suffixes–and show it to your Suzuki Marine dealer. He has a model identification guide that will allow him to translate all those letters and numbers into the exact model of any Suzuki outboard. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

Suzuki Marine Limited Warranty

The standard warranty for a new Suzuki Outboard is as follows: 5 year limited warranty for Non-Commercial use. 1 year warranty for either Commercial use or Rental use.

Suzuki Marine Limited Warranty (April 2021)

What is “counter rotation”?

If you have dual-mounted engines (Twins) and the propeller blades are turning clock wise (right), your boat is going to have a tendency to move in that direction as well. That problem is solved with counter-rotating props, one turning counter clock wise (left) and the other turning clock wise (right). This feature provides straighter steering, more level trim, balanced thrust and zero torque thrust. In other words, it keeps you going straight where you want to go. It’s a feature found on the DF140A, DF150, DF175, DF200, DF225, DF250, and 300hp models. Suzuki has advanced this design by integrating both Standard and Counter-Rotation into a single unit – Suzuki Selective Rotation. By strengthening the lower unit’s forward and reverse gearing, Suzuki engineers have designed a lower unit for the DF300AP and DF250AP that will run in either right or left rotation. This system has many benefits to the Boat Builder, Dealer and Retail Consumer. Suzuki Selective Rotation eliminates the need to purchase a dedicated “Counter-Rotation” outboard by using a special switch that when connected to a circuit inside the engine compartment, turns a regular/standard-rotation outboard into a counter-rotation model. Boat Builders and Dealers do not need to stock standard and counter-rotation models, thus reducing inventory and flooring costs. When repowering, Retail Customers can have their counter-rotation model reprogrammed to standard-rotation for sale on the second hand market. This can help reduce the cost of repowering.

Operation

Why stainless steel props?

Stainless steel propellers provide increased durability and performance over aluminum propellers. Suzuki offers an incredible selection of Genuine Suzuki Stainless Steel Props for almost every application. Make sure to check out the Accessory section.

What is an externally mounted tilt switch and why do I need one?

Imagine this: You are at the launch ramp and are about to float your boat. The engine rests on the transom saver/trailering bracket. If you own a Suzuki outboard 40 horsepower and up, you won’t have to climb into the boat to tilt your engine up to remove the trailering bracket. Conveniently located on the side of the engine is a switch that allows for easy raising and lowering of the engine.

What is “counter rotation”?

If you have dual-mounted engines (Twins) and the propeller blades are turning clock wise (right), your boat is going to have a tendency to move in that direction as well. That problem is solved with counter-rotating props, one turning counter clock wise (left) and the other turning clock wise (right). This feature provides straighter steering, more level trim, balanced thrust and zero torque thrust. In other words, it keeps you going straight where you want to go. It’s a feature found on the DF140A, DF150, DF175, DF200, DF225, DF250, and 300hp models. Suzuki has advanced this design by integrating both Standard and Counter-Rotation into a single unit – Suzuki Selective Rotation. By strengthening the lower unit’s forward and reverse gearing, Suzuki engineers have designed a lower unit for the DF300AP and DF250AP that will run in either right or left rotation. This system has many benefits to the Boat Builder, Dealer and Retail Consumer. Suzuki Selective Rotation eliminates the need to purchase a dedicated “Counter-Rotation” outboard by using a special switch that when connected to a circuit inside the engine compartment, turns a regular/standard-rotation outboard into a counter-rotation model. Boat Builders and Dealers do not need to stock standard and counter-rotation models, thus reducing inventory and flooring costs. When repowering, Retail Customers can have their counter-rotation model reprogrammed to standard-rotation for sale on the second hand market. This can help reduce the cost of repowering.

Can I purchase an outboard motor, parts or accessories directly from American Suzuki?

Suzuki Marine USA does not have the staff and facilities that would be required for direct sales. Instead, to make it more convenient for customers across the U.S., Suzuki has set up more than 1000 Marine dealers nationwide. Not only are they best equipped to sell you Suzuki products, but they can provide comprehensive, expert service, right in your neighborhood. More importantly, because they live and boat in the same places you do, local dealers know more about the right kind of equipment for you. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

Suzuki Sequential Fuel Injection

Defining Digital

In basic terms, digital reduces any process to basic, extremely precise numerical components. Analog, the antithesis of digital, utilizes imprecise, complicated physical representations – lengths, dimensions, spatial comparisons, etc.

EFI in the Marine Industry

Though Digital EFI can be found in almost every automobile on the road, in the marine outboard industry, Suzuki is the only manufacturer to offer a full line of digitally-controlled EFI Four Stroke engines, from the DF40 through DF300. Only through years of experience with Digital EFI systems in its automobiles and motorcycles has Suzuki been able to bring this technology to the marine outboard market.

Considering the rapid rate in which digital technology continues to permeate our society, it is only logical that Digital EFI will eventually become the system of choice for outboard motors as well. The Suzuki line of EFI Four Stroke outboards contain what will become the industry-wide norm.

Suzuki’s state-of-the-art digital electronics technology, featured in each of these motors, monitors changing conditions on the water and in the motor, and maintains continuous access to a pre-programmed information “map.” The Digital EFI system then responds instantly to any changes in throttle setting, atmospheric pressure, cylinder wall temperature, exhaust manifold temperature, air temperature and engine speed by adjusting the air/fuel mixture according to this map.

The four-strokes have incorporated a sequential multi-point fuel injection system. Fuel is delivered to the engine through four (six on V-6 engines) high-pressure injectors. These injectors have a delivery timing that is directly related to the ignition timing and crankshaft positioning. Fuel is released at each injector at separate times in conjunction with each revolution of the crankshaft. The result of all this high technology is an outboard motor that starts instantly in all weather conditions, runs cleaner and has a quicker and crisper throttle response under all types of loads.

Predictably, Suzuki’s Digital EFI system accomplishes this much more accurately than analog-based injection systems. Analog systems – archaic by today’s standards – must rely on “average” settings that lack the precision of digital-based controls when operating under the wide variety of conditions outboard motors face every day.

Conclusion

Currently Suzuki Marine enjoys its place as the technological leader among outboard manufacturers, and can always lay claim as the innovator of the Digital EFI system which will likely become a standard feature of all other outboard motors in the future.

FIGHTING CORROSION

Comprehensive Construction

This system starts with the construction of the engines. Suzuki outboard engines are cast from extra-strong, high grade aluminum alloys.

Next comes a multi-step surface treatment, beginning with a thorough cleaning of the aluminum alloy castings in a special chemical bath that removes any impurities or contaminants that might interfere with the adhesion of the surface coatings.

Once cleaned, the engine castings are submerged in an electrified bath of CrO2 (chromium oxide), or Alodine. This process alters the chemical composition of the surface, creating an invisible barrier that becomes an integral part of the casting to seal out corrosion.

The engines then receive an extremely hard and resilient baked-on epoxy resin primer engineered especially for marine applications. The epoxy primer completely covers all surfaces.

Once fully primered, the engine is given a final coat of a specialized Melamine resin marine grade paint. The Melamine paint cures to a tough yet lustrous finish to completely seal the engine castings from the saltwater environment. The result is an engine that is effectively triple-sealed against saltwater.

The Little Things Mean a Lot

This comprehensive surface treatment is only part of Suzuki’s anti-corrosion system. Along with these procedures, several special sacrificial zinc anodes are strategically placed both externally and within the cooling water passages. These replaceable zinc anodes take on the brunt of saltwater’s corrosive action, sacrificing themselves over time to preserve the overall integrity of the engine.

To help the zinc anodes work most effectively, Suzuki incorporates several special external and internal bonding wires on all models (except the 5 and 6 hp models), uniting all major engine parts. This seemingly simple but important step ensures that any corrosive action is directed away from metal engine components and toward the anodes.

Finishing Touches

Another key element in Suzuki’s anti-corrosion system is specialized marine-grade stainless steel, used for propellers, propeller shafts, driveshafts, shift rods and more. Stainless steel is also used for bolts, nuts and washers exposed to saltwater.

To further prevent galvanic corrosion, key bolts, nuts and washers are also coated with chrome plating or Dacromate, a specialized corrosion-fighting marine primer, to create a barrier between dissimilar metals. Cylinder head bolts and exhaust cover bolts are chrome-plated for added durability. Finally, exposed portions of primered stainless steel and tempered steel bolts, nuts and washers are sealed with a final coat of Melamine resin paint.

As part of the Suzuki advanced anti-corrosion system, the water pump housings on all prop-driven Suzuki outboards are also durable, corrosion-resistant stainless steel. This feature ensures that corrosion does not form within the water pump – and thus will not interfere with the all-important cooling function of the engine.

In addition to all of these corrosion fighting features, the one-piece engine hood and baffled air induction systems on Suzuki outboard engines effectively seal the powerhead from saltwater.

This advanced anti-corrosion system has earned Suzuki engines an enviable reputation for reliability, durability and corrosion resistance from coast to coast – especially where corrosion is worst.

MAINTENANCE

Click on any Maintenance question to receive an answer:

What does the warning buzzer and subsequent flashing light mean?

You should read your Owner’s Manual before operating your Suzuki Outboard. It will explain various warnings you might encounter during operation. The monitor gauge will illuminate why the warning buzzer has sounded. If the warning buzzer is indicating a problem with oil or overheating, it will also be accompanied by a reduction in maximum RPM. The buzzer will sound when the engine is started. The warning system will sound and the oil light will illuminate after the first 20 hours of operation – it is time for the first oil change. This process will repeat after another 80 hours of operation and then again after every 100 hours of operation. Conditions like low oil and overheating can seriously damage your engine. If you are unable to determine why the buzzer has sounded, you should check with your authorized Suzuki Marine dealer before continued operation.

Can I use the Tilt Support Lever for transporting my Suzuki outboard?

No. The Tilt Support Lever is to be used only for storage purposes. The Tilt Support Lever was not designed to withstand the strain of transport and could break causing damage to the Tlit Support Lever and/or other bracket components. There are many aftermarket companies that provide “transom savers” that can offer a solution for your transportation needs. Please make sure that whatever aftermarket component you use is designed to work specifically with your Suzuki outboard. You can review “Storage and Transportation” instruction in your Owner’s Manual. You can find this information in the Maintenance section.

May I start the engine out of water?

Never start your engine out of water unless you are using an external lower-unit flushing adapter, commonly known as “ear muffs” designed for your type of outboard motor (not the integral Freshwater Flush Adapter found on some engines) to provide cooling water from a garden hose. Otherwise, you could damage or seize the engine. Operate at no more than an advanced idle with good water pressure. Never put the engine in gear. Never leave a running engine unattended.

Is there a specific oil requirement to maintain my Suzuki four-stroke Outboard?

We suggest that customer use Genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards.

What is the best way to get answers to questions I have about my Suzuki Outboard Motor?

Your Owner’s Manual or local Suzuki dealer can answer most common questions.

What are the average costs of dealer service centers including parts and labor-shop rates?

Shop rates vary around the nation and within each state. They can range anywhere from $50.00 per hour to $160.00 per hour. This rate is subject to change. As far as what dealers charge for basic maintenance, your best bet would be to call a few dealers. All of the Suzuki Marine dealers are listed on this web site.

Is there a specific oil requirement to maintain my Suzuki four-stroke Outboard?

We suggest that customer use Genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards.

Can I get parts for a very old Suzuki outboard?

Suzuki will do its best to get you the parts you need, but the older the motor, the less likely it is that parts will be readily available. Availability, to a certain extent, depends on how many models the specific part was used for and the number of years your model was produced. You’ll find the manufacturer’s identification tag on the motor mount bracket, generally on the starboard (right) side of the bracket. Be sure to take down all the information on the model designator, including all prefixes and suffixes and show it to your Suzuki dealer. We’ll do everything possible to help you get new parts for your older Suzuki outboard.

How often should I change my oil in my Suzuki outboard?

The first oil change is at the 20-hour service and then every 6 months or 100 hours. No big deal.

What type of oil should I use in my Suzuki outboard?

We suggest that customers use genuine Suzuki 4 Cycle Engine Oil. We feel our oil is the best available on the market today. Our oils are formulated to provide superior lubrication and protection for internal engine parts in the harsh marine environment. Suzuki oil meets the National Marine Manufacturer Association (NMMA) Four Cycle Water Cooled (FC-W) standards. The actual oil recommendation is: SAE or NMMA FC-W 10W-40 (operating in temps from 14 degrees to over 100 degrees F) or 10W-30 (operating in temps from -4 degrees to 86 degrees F) API or NMMA FC-W Classification SE,SF,SG,SJ. For temps below -15 degrees F use SAE or NMMA FC-W 5W-30.

I keep my boat in the water and am concerned about flushing it regularly. What can I do?

Suzuki outboards are equipped with fresh water flush ports (all models except DF2.5, 9.9, 15, 40 and 50). A simple garden hose attachment makes it easy to clean the cooling system of saltwater and impurities. In fact, DF70, 80, 90, 250SS and 300 have dual flushing ports. One is located on the backside of the down housing and the second is located on the front panel to provide easy access and no excuses.

Is the timing chain really maintenance free?

Yes it is! The timing chain is located below the powerhead where it runs in a continual oil bath for dependable and quiet operation. With Suzuki’s exclusive automatic hydraulic chain tensioner, you can focus on boating and having a good time. (DF40, 50, 60, 70, 90, 115, 140, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 250SS, 300).

How do I enhance fuel efficiency?

Use the propeller that best suits your boat and style of boating.

Propeller size and pitch can have a great effect on fuel efficiency. Too much pitch can overload the motor. Too little can result in over-revving and engine damage. Suzuki offers a wide selection of propellers to meet anyone’s needs.

Use the highest quality gasoline and oil available.

Low octane, stale or contaminated fuel simply doesn’t burn as efficiently as fresh, high-grade gasoline. The same holds true for oil, as cheap, low-quality oils can foul spark plugs and create deposits. Use Suzuki oil to ensure quality.

Check all of your safety gear and keep track of what is in your boat.

It is a good idea to look through every and all storage areas of your boat. Check all of your safety gear and replace the broken or worn out items as necessary.

Keep your engine tuned up.

Periodically replace the spark plugs, fuel filters and other components that affect fuel efficiency. Check your owner’s manual for the recommended service schedule. If you don’t feel comfortable servicing the outboard engine yourself, take it to your marine dealer.

Make sure the bottom of your boat is as clean as possible.

If you keep your boat in the water, have the bottom cleaned often of growths such as barnacles and algae. And make sure any bottom paint (EPA-approved) is applied smoothly, with brush strokes running parallel to the keel.

Trim your engine for maximum fuel economy.

The trim angle can strongly influence fuel economy. Check your owner’s manual or see your marine dealer for the proper trim techniques.

Operate your boat in a reasonable and safe manner.

Don’t operate your boat at excessive speed, and use extra throttle only when necessary. Not only is it safer, but you’ll maximize your fuel efficiency as well.

How do I care for an onboard battery system?

Make sure you’re using marine-type batteries.

Automotive batteries are not designed to handle the demands created by marine applications. Marine batteries are designed with thicker plates and other heavy-duty features that help them withstand the jarring life aboard a boat.

Use deep-cycle batteries for running electrical accessories.

A boat equipped with electrical accessories such as Tolling Motors, GPS, VHF Radios, Bait Pumps, Windless, and Fish Finders should be using one or more “deep-cycle” marine batteries. While most other kinds of batteries are designed to provide a lot of current in a short burst (such as when starting your engine), deep-cycle batteries provide smaller amounts of power for a longer time. Deep-cycle batteries also stand up better to repeated discharge/recharge cycles.

Inspect your battery condition regularly.

Test your marine battery system on a regular basis to ensure that it’s in top working condition. This is especially important after winter storage. Check the battery exterior for damage or cracks, and replace immediately if any are found. Inspect the cables and terminals, and make sure they are firmly attached, without cracks or corrosion. Coat the terminals with an insulating film of grease, install anti-corrosive washers, or apply protective battery terminal spray. If your battery is the “open cell” type, check its water level. If low, refill with distilled water.

Consider a dual battery system.

If you fish long distances offshore or cruise to remote locations, you should consider a dual battery system. This virtually doubles your onboard electrical power and provides an important back-up of reserve power. Options include a system with a selector switch, allowing you to choose one or the other battery (or both), or a battery isolator, which automatically directs your engine’s charging power to the battery that needs it most. Note: never switch battery selector while engine(s) is (are) running.

Re-charge your batteries immediately after each trip.

Waiting several days after a trip to charge your batteries will allow deposits to develop on the internal plates, reducing their capacity to provide power. Suzuki’s high-output alternators help to minimize this, but if your batteries need to be recharged, do so immediately to minimize deposits and extend the life of your battery.

Use at least a 10- to 15-amp battery charger.

Do not use a “trickle” charger, and make sure you bring your batteries up to 100 percent state of charge before using again.

How do I use and care for my outboard engine in saltwater?

Flush your outboard with fresh water after each trip.

Use a quality “ear muff” style flushing adapter that fits on the lower unit water pick-up (or flushing port when available), and run your engine at idle speed (in neutral) for at least 5 minutes to flush out any salt. Your owner’s manual will give you more information (including important safety precautions) on this procedure.

Wash and wax your outboard engine.

Careful washing with mild soap and water not only makes your outboard look good, but also removes salt and other deposits. An application of a good quality marine wax will help to seal and protect the finish against the sun and salt.

Treat your engine with silicone spray.

Every second or third trip, remove the hood of your outboard (make sure the engine is turned off and cool to the touch) and apply a thin film of silicone spray to the power head. Be sure to use a type of silicone spray that won’t damage rubber and plastic. One of the best for this is CRC brand heavy-duty silicone lubricant, no. 765-1422.

Touch up nicks and scratches in the paint.

Inspect your outboard frequently for nicks and scratches, places where corrosion can get started and spread. Touch up any superficial scratches with a color-matched touch-up paint. On deeper scratches—especially where bare metal is exposed—use a top-quality metal primer first.

Store your engine out of direct sunlight.

The direct ultraviolet rays of the sun can damage the finish and deteriorate the exterior plastic and rubber components. For this reason, it is best to store your engine out of direct sunlight. If direct sunlight is unavoidable, keep the engine shielded with a top-quality, UV-resistant fabric cover while in storage.

Grease key points of your outboard engine.

Your Suzuki comes equipped with special grease fittings to lubricate and prevent corrosion at key points where the engine pivots and swivels. Using a grease gun, apply grease through these fittings regularly, as recommended in your owner’s manual. Also, periodically remove the propeller and apply a film of grease to the propeller shaft.

Replace sacrificial zinc anodes as recommended.

Most outboard engines are equipped with zinc anodes which “sacrifice” themselves in order to protect other metal parts from corrosion. To keep working properly, however, these zinc anodes need to be replaced as recommended in your owner’s manual or once they dwindle to less than 50 percent of their original size. In some extraordinarily corrosive salt water areas, it is wise to add an extra zinc anode below the water line of your boat and bond it to the engine with a quality marine electrical wire. Your dealer can help you decide if this is needed. See your Suzuki accessories catalog for part numbers and further information.

PURCHASING

Click on any Purchasing question to receive an answer:

Can I purchase an outboard motor, parts or accessories directly from American Suzuki?

Suzuki Marine USA does not have the staff and facilities that would be required for direct sales. Instead, to make it more convenient for customers across the U.S., Suzuki has set up more than 1000 Marine dealers nationwide. Not only are they best equipped to sell you Suzuki products, but they can provide comprehensive, expert service, right in your neighborhood. More importantly, because they live and boat in the same places you do, local dealers know more about the right kind of equipment for you. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

TECHNOLOGY

Click on any Technology question to receive an answer:

Exhaust

What is the CARB emissions rating for Suzuki Outboards?

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) requires manufacturers to apply environmental emission rating labels to all new outboard engines starting in model year 2001. The Emission label will keep consumers informed when making a purchase decision. California emission regulations are stricter than EPA regulations. They feature 3 levels of “clean” low emission product.

One Star-Low Emission

One Star-Low Emission

The one-star label identifies engines that meet the CARB 2001 exhaust emissions standards. Engines meeting these standards have 75% lower emissions than conventional carbureted 2-stroke engines. These engines are equivalent to U.S. EPA’s 2006 standards for marine engines.

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

Two Stars-Very Low Emission

The two-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2004 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 20% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

Three Stars-Ultra Low Emission

The three-star label identifies engines that meet CARB 2008 exhaust emission standards. Engines meeting these standards have 65% lower emissions than One Star-Low Emission engines.

Every Suzuki four-stroke outboard motor already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has earned the 2008 California Air Resource Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions rating.

Do the new DF70/60s meet the EPA emission requirements for 2006?

They not only meet the EPA requirements for 2006, they are twice as clean as they need to be today!

What is a 4 into 2 into 1 Exhaust System?

Suzuki engineers pioneered this exhaust system on the DF115A and DF140A outboard motors. The design increases the low end to mid range torque and provides a wide powerband. With an increased volume of air flowing efficiently into the engine, it becomes necessary to increase the exhaust efficiency as well. The 4 into 2 into 1 exhaust system is cast into the cylinder head and block. This race proven technology reduces drag in the exhaust system allowing for a smooth and orderly flow out of the cylinder head.

Suzuki Electronic Fuel Injection

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

What is sequential multi-point fuel injection?

Sequential multi-point fuel injection constantly supplies the proper fuel/air ratio to each cylinder resulting in improved fuel economy, crisp acceleration and reduced emissions.

What is Variable Valve Timing (VVT)??

The cam shaft(s) in a four stroke engine determines when the valves, both intake and exhaust, open and close. Cam shaft(s) are designed with specific duration (the amount of time the valve is closed) and lift (the height the valve opens). Typically a high performance engine will create the most torque near the top end of a specified RPM range. But an outboard motor also needs to have a strong mid and low end torque range. This is where VVT comes in. By varying the intake valve timing by as much as 40 degrees, the cam shaft timing is optimized for low range and mid range torque. This process is controlled by hydraulic pressure from the oil pump. It is all automatic. All you have to do is go boating. Suzuki variable valve timing is standard on the DF175, 250, 250SS and the 300.

What is Multi-Stage Induction?

Multi-stage induction enhances engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold according to engine RPM. The system utilizes two intake manifold pipes per cylinder, one operating at low RPM and the other operating at high RPM. When the engine is operating a lower RPM, air enters the combustion chamber through the longer curved manifold pipe. The length of the pipe is designed to improve combustion and boost low end torque. As the RPM increases past a threshold, the valve on the direct intake pipe opens, letting air enter directly into the combustion chamber through the short, straight in take pipes. The engine will receive a greater volume of air thus improving the high speed power output. This system is standard on the DF175, 225 and 250.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32 Bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer the adjusts it’s settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

How does the Multi-Stage Induction help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

The DF175 and DF150 incorporate a multi-stage induction system to enhance engine performance by changing the length of the intake manifold pipes according to engine speed.

Lower Unit

What is a streamline gear case?

Suzuki’s streamlined gear case has a hydrodynamic design that reduces drag as the lower unit moves through the water. This contributes to faster acceleration, increased fuel economy and top end speed. (DF70A, DF90A, DF250SS, DF250AP, DF300AP)

Why does Suzuki use such a low gear ratio?

Suzuki engineers have verified through countless hours of testing that an outboard propeller with a large diameter will carry a bigger load. Essentially, the large diameter will push more water. Also during the testing, the engineers verified a larger pitch propeller will have less slip. Armed with this information, the engineers have designed Suzuki outboard motors with a large Cubic Inch Displacement, (remember there is no replacement for displacement), light weight and an aggressive final drive ratio. This is why Suzuki can get down with the down low – ratio that is. See specifications for gear ratio.

Corrosion

How does Suzuki fight saltwater corrosion?

Suzuki uses a basic four-part system to fight the effects of saltwater corrosion, beginning with the use of high-grade aluminum alloys for the engine castings.

Next comes the three-part surface treatment that begins with a thorough chemical cleaning of the casting to eliminate anything that might prevent the adhesion of the surface coatings.

After the chemical cleaning, the parts are submerged in an electrified bath of chromium oxide. The bath changes the make-up of the casting’s surface and creates an invisible barrier that literally becomes a part of the casting.

An extremely hard but resilient epoxy resin primer is baked on. Finally, the castings are given a final coat of urethane marine grade paint. This paint cures to a tough, yet lustrous finish, completely sealing the engine from the saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do zinc anodes help fight corrosion?

Along with Suzuki’s surface treatment, zinc anodes are strategically placed on the outside of the down housing of the lower unit and within the cooling water passages of the engine block. These replaceable anodes take on the brunt of saltwater’s corrosive action, sacrificing themselves over time to preserve the integrity of the engine. Click here for more information.

What other corrosion-fighting features are there?

To prevent galvanic corrosion, key bolts, nuts and washers are also coated with chrome or Dacromate, a specialized corrosion-fighting marine primer that creates a barrier between dissimilar metals. Cylinder head bolts and exhaust cover bolts are chrome-plated for added durability, and exposed portions of stainless steel and tempered steel bolts, nuts and washers are sealed with a final coat of urethane paint.

As a final measure, Suzuki’s one-piece engine hood and baffled air induction system effectively seals the powerhead from saltwater. This comprehensive anti-corrosion system assures you of reliability, durability and corrosion resistance in any saltwater environment. Click here for more information.

How do I use and care for my outboard engine in saltwater?

Flush your outboard with fresh water after each trip.

Use a quality “ear muff” style flushing adapter that fits on the lower unit water pick-up (or flushing port when available), and run your engine at idle speed (in neutral) for at least 5 minutes to flush out any salt. Your owner’s manual will give you more information (including important safety precautions) on this procedure.

Wash and wax your outboard engine.

Careful washing with mild soap and water not only makes your outboard look good, but also removes salt and other deposits. An application of a good quality marine wax will help to seal and protect the finish against the sun and salt.

Treat your engine with silicone spray.

Every second or third trip, remove the hood of your outboard (make sure the engine is turned off and cool to the touch) and apply a thin film of silicone spray to the power head. Be sure to use a type of silicone spray that won’t damage rubber and plastic. One of the best for this is CRC brand heavy-duty silicone lubricant, no. 765-1422.

Touch up nicks and scratches in the paint.

Inspect your outboard frequently for nicks and scratches, places where corrosion can get started and spread. Touch up any superficial scratches with a color-matched touch-up paint. On deeper scratches—especially where bare metal is exposed—use a top-quality metal primer first.

Store your engine out of direct sunlight.

The direct ultraviolet rays of the sun can damage the finish and deteriorate the exterior plastic and rubber components. For this reason, it is best to store your engine out of direct sunlight. If direct sunlight is unavoidable, keep the engine shielded with a top-quality, UV-resistant fabric cover while in storage.

Grease key points of your outboard engine.

Your Suzuki comes equipped with special grease fittings to lubricate and prevent corrosion at key points where the engine pivots and swivels. Using a grease gun, apply grease through these fittings regularly, as recommended in your owner’s manual. Also, periodically remove the propeller and apply a film of grease to the propeller shaft.

Replace sacrificial zinc anodes as recommended.

Most outboard engines are equipped with zinc anodes which “sacrifice” themselves in order to protect other metal parts from corrosion. To keep working properly, however, these zinc anodes need to be replaced as recommended in your owner’s manual or once they dwindle to less than 50 percent of their original size. In some extraordinarily corrosive salt water areas, it is wise to add an extra zinc anode below the water line of your boat and bond it to the engine with a quality marine electrical wire. Your dealer can help you decide if this is needed. See your Suzuki accessories catalog for part numbers and further information.

Digital

What does “digital” mean?

Digital is the way computers process information, using combinations of binary digits, either zero or one. Digital coding can represent any given value as a coded number (for example, the ideal amount of air in relationship to the amount of fuel at a certain throttle setting). And, because the range of values that can be represented is infinite, digital codes allow exceptionally high precision. By using a small computer to “manage” an engine with digital codes for all of the various aspects of engine operation, such as fuel-to-air ratio, load and air temperature, engineers are able to design engines that run better, deliver better fuel economy and reduce emissions.

The opposite of digital is analog. Carburetors are analog instruments. Their actuation is mechanical and must be preset to adjust for specific operating conditions. Electronic fuel injection, used on Suzuki outboards, is digital and provides virtually infinite settings to ensure ideal combustion in any conditions.

A personal computer is digital. An abacus is analog.

How will digital affect the marine industry?

Electronic fuel injection system (EFI) can be found on most of the automobiles on the road today. Because of the benefits of EFI—easier starting, better fuel economy and smoother power delivery–it is only a matter of time until this technology finds its way into common usage on all other internal combustion engines, such as motorcycles, snowmobiles and outboards.

Suzuki pioneered the use of digitally controlled EFI in the marine business. Suzuki’s advanced system monitors changing conditions on the water and in the motor, and instantly responds to changes in throttle setting, atmospheric pressure, temperature and engine speed by adjusting the air/fuel mixture to meet changing conditions.

The benefit to you is an outboard motor that starts instantly in all weather conditions, runs cleaner and has quicker and crisper throttle response under all types of loads. It also means your engine will run as well at sea level as it will at Lake Shasta. Digital EFI is standard on all Suzuki Outboard motors from DF40-DF300.

Where will digital technology go?

Digital technology is all around us. We first saw it in computers, and it has since moved into consumer electronics in CDs, digital compact cassettes, digital cellular communications and not to mention all of the new TV screens with High-Definition TV (HDTV). The automotive industry has been using it for years, first in exotic high-powered sports cars and now in the most mundane people hauler.

As time rolls on, we’re sure to see digital technology improving more and more aspects of our lives.

What is a 32 Bit ECM?

The ECM (Engine Control Module) constantly monitors crucial data from a series of sensors placed in critical areas on the engine. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor, Crankshaft Position Sensor, Intake Air Temperature Sensor and Exhaust Jacket Temperature Sensor. Using a very powerful 32-bit computer, the ECM processes data from all of these sensors and instantly calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each cylinder via the multi point sequential fuel injection system. Benefits from this system include reduced exhaust emissions, lower fuel consumption, smooth starts, crisper acceleration, smoother performance and maximum efficiency.

How will EFI, Direct Ignition and a 32 Bit computer interact?

Suzuki’s goal is to design motors that serve specific boating purposes over a wide variety of conditions. The key to Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system with Direct Ignition is a powerful 32-bit computer. These systems allow Suzuki engineers to program the engine’s internal computer to constantly monitor crucial data in real time. This comprehensive network of sensors includes the Manifold Absolute Pressure, Crankshaft Position, Intake Air and Cylinder Wall temperature, Camshaft Position and Exhaust Jacket temperature. The sensors provide optimum fuel/air mixture and ignition timing for specific applications. The 32 Bit computer adjusts its settings to provide the best performance for existing conditions.

What is a monitor gauge system?

What is a monitor gauge system?

It’s a light, it’s a buzzer, it’s a system that Suzuki pioneered over 20 years ago that can save your engine, your wallet and your day. Suzuki’s Digital ignition systems are complemented by an engine monitoring system that keeps the operator constantly informed of vital engine functions. In the event one or more sensors detect the following:

1. A higher than normal water temperature
2. An over rev condition
3. An low oil pressurer
4. And a convenient oil change reminder

the operator is alerted to the potential problem with a light, a buzzer and a reduction in engine rpm. The oil change reminder does not lower the RPM, but the gauge will light up and the buzzer will continue to beep until the reset. The Monitor gauge is designed for the DF40-300. (See your local Suzuki Marine dealer or read your owners manual)

What is IAC Valve and what does it do?

An IAC (Idle Air Control) valve is found on the Suzuki DF40-DF300. This valve, which is also found in all of our fuel-injected automobiles, maintains a constant idle speed by regulating the amount of air that enters the intake system. The use of an IAC enables these engines to maintain a steady and consistent idle speed.

What is digital multi point sequential electronic fuel injection?

Suzuki’s electronic fuel injection system makes use of the latest technology and computer control. The system’s electronic control unit monitors throttle setting, engine RPM, cylinder wall and air-intake temperature and atmospheric pressure. It then automatically calculates the optimum amount of fuel to be injected into the combustion chamber at the exact time. The benefit is smoother and faster acceleration, crisp throttle response, maximum fuel economy and quick, reliable starting no matter what the temperature.

Suzuki’s digital multi point sequential EFI represents the ultimate in outboard efficiency and is found on all Suzuki outboards from the DF40 to the DF300.

Engine

What is Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology?

Suzuki 4-Stroke Technology

Four-stroke engines are clearly the dominate force in marine outboard power. When done right, they’re cleaner, quieter, more efficient and more economical than a comparable two-stroke. Over the years, Suzuki has built millions of four-stroke automobile and motorcycle engines, which makes it easy for us to transfer all that proven know-how to an outboard motor. Our commitment to technology means you get better value from our outboards with better fuel economy, improved reliability, and exciting performance. And that is why Suzuki is able to offer the most advanced four-stroke outboard motors on the market today.

The Evolution Continues

What do we mean by “most advanced”? Well, our digital sequential fuel injection reduces fuel consumption by 75% compared to an equal displacement two-stroke, and by 30% when compared to competitive four-stroke outboards. Suzuki’s fully-transistorized direct ignition, the first in outboard power, ensures first-time starts and maximum power, and helps prevent misfires. The tuned intake manifold boosts low- to mid-range performance for quicker acceleration. The cooling system uses a thermostat to maintain optimum operating temperature for maximum engine efficiency.

You’ll find similar combinations of proven automotive and marine technologies in our new portable DF30/25 models and portable 15 and 9.9 horsepower four-strokes as well.

And every Suzuki four-stroke already meets applicable EPA emissions standards for the 2006 model year. Every Suzuki Outboard has also earned the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 3 Star Ultra Low Emissions Rating.

A Closer Look

No one else can match the engineering found on Suzuki Outboard engines. And here’s why:

  • The DF25 is unique in the fact that it utilizes a single-cam, 3-valve head design (two intake valves, one exhaust valve). This design, when used in combination with a 538cc displacement (with a bore and stroke of 71mm x 68mm), provides greater output and low-end torque, resulting in outboards that are easier to handle, even at lower speeds.
  • An in-line, three-cylinder, automotive-type engine was utilized in the design of the DF50/40 Suzuki. Components such as valves, valve springs, tappets, sprockets, timing chain and fuel filter are all identical to those used in Suzuki automotive engines. Because of the different operating conditions and environment, however, the engines have been given a larger bore and longer stroke to provide maximum power in a marine application. Critical structural parts have been redesigned for marine use, such as the cylinder head, block, crankshaft, connecting rods, camshafts and pistons, to provide maximum reliability and durable operation. Metal gaskets have also been employed in critical areas.
  • The DF50/40, on the other hand, uses a Dual Over Head Camshaft (DOHC) cylinder head, featuring four valves for each cylinder. This compact, modern head utilizes a Pent Roof design, which allows for closer placement of the intake and exhaust valves, helping to optimize combustion efficiency. A center-positioned spark plug and high-compression ratio are also incorporated to maximize engine performance.
  • The DF50/40 were the first outboard motors to be equipped with an enclosed, oil-bathed timing chain, which is kept in check with an automatic hydraulic tensioner. Highly durable, the system will provide owners with years of maintenance-free operation.
  • A crankshaft-driven lubrication system with a trochoid type oil pump is used in all of Suzuki’s bigger four-strokes. With the inclusion of a cartridge type oil filter, the durability of the crank journal and big end have been greatly improved. The oil drain is positioned on the front side of the engine, making oil changes easier, and allows for easy servicing in the full tilt position.
  • The long-track intake manifolds utilized on Suzuki’s DF40-70 models are made of a special corrosion-resistant plastic, and are designed to increase the velocity of the fuel-air mix for more power and quieter operation. In addition, this style of air intake system reduces changes in air temperature and helps to increase power, as well as acting as a large-volume silencer to reduce engine noise levels.
  • The solid-state ignition system found on the DF40-70 models provide twice as much power to the spark plug, allowing for cleaner, more complete combustion, maximizing power with every stroke.
  • The Digital CDI utilized on the DF4, 6, and 25 provides precise control of engine performance. Sensors providing engine rpm and temperature data in real-time allow the unit’s computer to instantly determine optimum engine timing. The results are smooth operation at low speed, powerful acceleration, and stable operation at high speed.
  • The DF40, 50, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 250SS and 300 features a “direct ignition” system, which is more compact and simpler in design because it uses fewer parts than conventional ignition systems. The ignition coils are integrated within the spark plug caps, simplifying the wiring system and greatly reducing electronic engine “noise,” which can interfere with VHF radios, fishfinders and other marine electronics.
  • Suzuki High output alternators will keep your electronics humming.
  • An advanced computer diagnostic system allows dealership technicians to quickly troubleshoot the DF40-300 models, thus reducing diagnostic time.

The Heart of the Matter

One of the most important features found on the Suzuki DF40-300 models is the Sequential Multi-Point Digital EFI system. Improved fuel economy and optimum power are achieved through the constant monitoring of engine and operating conditions by way of highly-advanced computer-control. With this particular electronic fuel injection system these outboards are able to pass future emission regulations today while providing lower fuel consumption, easier starting, better drivability and outstanding throttle response.

The E.C.M. (Engine Control Module) system incorporated into these models controls the engines’ ignition system and also provides an ideal fuel supply under all running conditions. The E.C.M. constantly monitors crucial data, in real time, from a series of sensors placed in critical areas in the engine. The sensor system is made up of M.A.P. (Manifold Absolute Pressure), Engine RPM Sensor, Air Intake Temperature Sensor, Exhaust Manifold Temperature Sensor and Cylinder Wall Temperature Sensor. The data from these sensors is conveyed to a computer which instantly calculates (Speed-Density type) the optimum amount of fuel to be injected at high pressure into each of the cylinders.

Also incorporated on these models are the Idle Air Control, a Fast Idle function and a Dash Pot System to provide stable engine operation at all times. The I.A.C. is programmed to let the engine idle at a low rpm. Regulating intake air under different running conditions, intake air is increased when the engine’s rpm is too low, and decreased when rpm is too high.

A Fast Idle Function provides quick starts and smooth, stable engine warmups. When the engine is started, the I.A.C. valve fully opens to let an increased flow of air into the cylinder.

Suzuki’s Dash Pot System is of an electronic type; other manufacturers generally use mechanical systems. The Electronic Dash Pot System only functions when there is a sudden throttle transition, from open to closed, smoothly reducing rpm to lessen stress on the engine.

Although common in automotive applications, Suzuki was the first to incorporate a Solid State Full Transistor Digital Ignition System into an outboard engine application. This system taps into voltage supplied by the battery, enabling it to increase spark duration regardless of engine speed—a nine-fold increase compared to spark duration produced by conventional CDI units. The result is a doubling of spark strength. Compared to conventional CDI units, it is controlled with only 1/10th the voltage. The circuit design is simplified and creates more energy and a longer fuel burn, therefore increasing durability and reliability.

The Bottom Line

No other outboard manufacturer has more knowledge about engines than Suzuki. We’ve been building engines for automobiles, motorcycles and outboards for decades. Our technical resources are enormous. Suzuki is the largest corporation manufacturing a full line of outboard motors. We know the technology inside and out; we know it works. Our innovation is based on experience and good old fashioned know how.

What does custom performance mean?

Boating is not a one-size-fits-all activity. Requirements for various aspects not only require different types of boats, but also motors with different types of power deliveries and other characteristics. As an example, in the real world of bass fishing, you have lightning-fast hole shots, wide-open throttle runs, and then long sit-and-fish periods. Suzuki’s DF250SS is engineered to provide maximum performance under just these conditions. In addition to electronic fuel injection, it features a 4.0 liter Big Block V6 Four-Stroke engine with Variable Valve Timing, Multi Stage Induction, Forge Pistons, Offset Drive Shaft, Two Stage DOHC, Streamlined Gear Case, 32 Bit computer, Direct Ignition, High Output Alternator, Regulated Dual Charging System, Tilt Limit Switch and Dual Engine Flush Ports. This outboard will flat-out get with the program.

On the other hand, offshore fishing requires an engine capable of making long runs at mid-range throttle settings, going out to where the fish are and then spending hours at low trolling speeds. Suzuki’s Offshore DF200, 225, 250 and 300 V6 outboards are engineered to power fishing boats and offshore cruisers. These engines provide exceptional mid-range torque and are programmed for maximum performance and efficiency during lengthy cruises or long trolling sessions. These outboards offer all of the advantages of Suzuki’s 4-stroke technology, such as superior fuel economy, quiet, low vibration and environmentally friendly operation all while providing impressive performance and rock-solid reliability.

Don’t over look any of the awesome Suzuki 4-stroke outboards we have to offer. From the mighty mite DF2.5 all the way up to our Flag Ship DF300, we have the power you want.

How powerful a motor do I really need?

When it comes to choosing an outboard motor, today’s buyer is faced with a dizzying array of choices. Working with a knowledgeable dealer who listens to what you have to say is the best way to make the right decisions. A dealer can help you match the right amount of power to your specific boating needs. By taking into account factors such as hull weight, frequency of use, horsepower rating and, of course, budget, you and your dealer can put together a boat and motor package that makes sense.

Why a 55-degree V6?

A 55-degree bank angle creates a compact V6 outboard motor. The DF200, 225, 250, 250SS and DF300 all have a 55-degree block. Suzuki Engineers designed an all-new 55-degree V-Block, an industry first! This design is narrower, allowing the V6 engines to be mounted on 26″ centers; great news for people who want to repower an older boat – most other outboard brands in this HP category will have to be mounted on 28″, or greater, centers.

What is DOHC and why is it important for me and my outboard motor?

DOHC stands for “Dual Over Head Camshaft” cylinder head design. This design uses two separate camshafts: one for the intake and the other for the exhaust valves. This efficient head design, in conjunction with 4 valves per cylinder, enables Suzuki engineers to get the maximum power and economy while the physical engine size is kept compact and light.

How come my new Suzuki Outboard doesn’t have any spark plug wires?

The DF40,50,70,80,90,150,175,200,225,250,250SS and DF300 feature another Suzuki industry first—Direct Ignition. Adapted from our automotive division, this unique system incorporates the ignition coil right in the spark plug cap! This reduces the number of parts and simplifies the wiring system as well as reducing the effect of radio frequency interference on your onboard electronics.

How much charging capacity do I need?

Suzuki Outboards have been designed with high output alternators to provide ample power for engine & onboard electronics, even at low rpm. All V6 models (DF200-DF300) have 54 amp alternators that will output a full 38 amps at 1000 RPMs. The Big Block 150/175 are equipped with 44 amp alternators and will output over 35 amps at 1000 RPMs. This is enough power to keep an assortment of electronics up and running.

Why is an Offset Drive Shaft better?

The Suzuki offset drive shaft positions the powerhead forward of the drive shaft for improved balance and less vibration on the transom. This proven design makes for a compact engine and places the axis of inertia, the point where vibrations produced, are at a minimum. This design is incorporated in the DF70 through 300.

What is Big Block Displacement?

The Suzuki 4 cylinder DOHC 2.867 liter DF150/175 has the largest displacement in this class. It is also the most compact in its class. Smaller on the outside, yet the inside has more displacement than a competitor’s 6 cylinder models. The Suzuki V-6 DOHC 200/225/250 models are 3.6 liter and are the largest displacement and most compact in their class. The list just keeps growing. Remember, “There is no Replacement for Displacement”.

How does a Counter Balancer System help my DF150/175 Suzuki outboard?

In-line four-cylinder engines operating at high RPM generates a secondary vibration that is directly in line with the piston’s movement. In order to counter this vibration, suzuki engineers utilize a secondary balancer system, which produces a horizontal motion against the piston’s movement. To produce this horizontal motion, the balancer is divided into left and right sections, each rotating in an opposite direction. Rotating at twice the speed of the crankshaft, the balancers effectively counter these secondary vibrations and produce a smoother operating engine.

What is the Thrust Mount System?

On both the upper and lower mounts, a combination of soft and high thrust rubber bushings are utilized to absorb vibration and improve performance. This system is utilized on the DF70 through DF300.

Operation

Why stainless steel props?

Stainless steel propellers provide increased durability and performance over aluminum propellers. Suzuki offers an incredible selection of Genuine Suzuki Stainless Steel Props for almost every application. Make sure to check out the Accessory section.

What is an externally mounted tilt switch and why do I need one?

Imagine this: You are at the launch ramp and are about to float your boat. The engine rests on the transom saver/trailering bracket. If you own a Suzuki outboard 40 horsepower and up, you won’t have to climb into the boat to tilt your engine up to remove the trailering bracket. Conveniently located on the side of the engine is a switch that allows for easy raising and lowering of the engine.

What is “counter rotation”?

If you have dual-mounted engines (Twins) and the propeller blades are turning clock wise (right), your boat is going to have a tendency to move in that direction as well. That problem is solved with counter-rotating props, one turning counter clock wise (left) and the other turning clock wise (right). This feature provides straighter steering, more level trim, balanced thrust and zero torque thrust. In other words, it keeps you going straight where you want to go. It’s a feature found on the DF140A, DF150, DF175, DF200, DF225, DF250, and 300hp models. Suzuki has advanced this design by integrating both Standard and Counter-Rotation into a single unit – Suzuki Selective Rotation. By strengthening the lower unit’s forward and reverse gearing, Suzuki engineers have designed a lower unit for the DF300AP and DF250AP that will run in either right or left rotation. This system has many benefits to the Boat Builder, Dealer and Retail Consumer. Suzuki Selective Rotation eliminates the need to purchase a dedicated “Counter-Rotation” outboard by using a special switch that when connected to a circuit inside the engine compartment, turns a regular/standard-rotation outboard into a counter-rotation model. Boat Builders and Dealers do not need to stock standard and counter-rotation models, thus reducing inventory and flooring costs. When repowering, Retail Customers can have their counter-rotation model reprogrammed to standard-rotation for sale on the second hand market. This can help reduce the cost of repowering.

WARRANTY

Click on any Warranty question to receive an answer:

What does Model Year Elimination mean and how does it affect my Suzuki Outboard

We have studied the actions of the other major outboard manufacturers and now believe that Model Year Elimination will offer a host of benefits to our Customers, Dealers and Boat Builders. Suzuki Marine can now introduce new outboard models to the market during the boating season, instead of waiting until the model year change. Consumers will be able to purchase these models sooner than in the past. Dealers and Boat Builders will carry a better supply of outboards because they will not have to reduce inventory in advance of a Model Year Change.

How can I get in touch with the Suzuki Marine Customer Relations department?

IF YOU HAVE A CUSTOMER SERVICE INQUIRY:

A) Use the Dealer Locator tool to locate your nearest Suzuki Dealer or

B) Should you have a situation that you believe requires Suzuki’s immediate assistance, you may call Customer Service at (813) 687-5900 or email us at MarineCR@suz.com. Customer service representatives are available from 8:30am – 5:00pm EST. Or

C) Put your inquiry in a letter, including copies of all relevant documents (service records, etc.). Include the Outboard Model, 6-digit vehicle Identification Number (VIN), your full name, mailing address, and day/evening phone numbers to:

Suzuki Marine USA – Customer Service
P.O. BOX 262529
Tampa, FL 33635

Customer service inquiries for Suzuki Motor Vehicles usually involve documents which cannot be handled effectively via email. Therefore, inquiries which cannot be answered by your local dealer, should be submitted via U.S. mail. Please be advised that most customer service inquiries can be handled by your local Suzuki Marine dealer who is familiar with your area and your Outboard Motor.

We have found that speaking with a trained customer service representative eliminates misunderstandings, which are commonly encountered with email communication. We also know that situations can be resolved quickly when all the relevant facts, events and details are discussed in a thorough manner. It is essential to have your facts organized and available before calling us. This will speed the resolution process. Relevant information would include the following: model, vehicle Identification Number (VIN), date of purchase, selling and servicing dealer, names of staff you have already approached plus a summary of your needs and expectations.

How do I know if the Suzuki Outboard is the newest model

Here is an example to determine the newest model for a 70hp Suzuki outboard: The model designator for a first generation (built from 1998 – 2008) 70 horse-power engine was DF70TL. The replacement model is now a DF70ATL. Note the A designates the Next Generation Suzuki Marine’s newest model in the 70 horse-power category. In addition, the Suzuki Marine web site will promote the newest models available.

When will the warranty clock start ticking on my Suzuki Outboard

The warranty clock starts when a customer purchases a Suzuki Outboard Motor and the dealer retail registers the unit with Suzuki Marine. It makes no difference when the engine was manufactured. The standard warranty for a new Suzuki Outboard is as follows: 5 year limited warranty for Non-Commercial use. 1 year warranty for either Commercial use or Rental use.

I live in an outboard titling state (Missouri, Ohio, South Carolina, Utah or Texas). What will I need to register my new Suzuki Outboard Motor?

When a new Suzuki Outboard Motor is sold wholesale to a Boat Builder or Dealer, a MCO (Manufacturers Certificate of Origin) is mailed to the invoiced party. The MCO is an original title for the Suzuki Outboard Motor and the Manufacture Date will be used to date the engine. When the unit is sold at retail, the dealership should have this form on file. Each state titling method is a little different, so please refer to your local agency for the most up to date process.

What do I need to know about transferring the Suzuki Limited Warranty when I sell my motor?

Five things are required to transfer a warranty:

  • You must be the original owner.
  • The warranty transfer must be completed within 30 days of sale.
  • Make sure the motor has not previously been registered as a commercial or rental motor.
  • Of course, the motor must have remaining unused time on the warranty.
  • The new owner needs to show a Suzuki Marine dealer that the motor, its installation and maintenance have been done as prescribed in the owner’s manual and that no pre-existing, uncorrected conditions exist that may result in damage to a warrantable system or part.

Contact your local Suzuki Marine dealership for all details concerning the Suzuki Limited Warranty. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

How can I positively identify the exact model of a Suzuki outboard motor?

The manufacturer’s identification tag is found on the motor mount bracket, usually on the starboard (right) side of the engine. It lists all of the key information. Write down the information on the model designator–including all prefixes and suffixes–and show it to your Suzuki Marine dealer. He has a model identification guide that will allow him to translate all those letters and numbers into the exact model of any Suzuki outboard. To find the Suzuki dealer closest to you, click here.

Suzuki Marine Limited Warranty

The standard warranty for a new Suzuki Outboard is as follows: 5 year limited warranty for Non-Commercial use. 1 year warranty for either Commercial use or Rental use.

Suzuki Marine Limited Warranty (April 2021)

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